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split-off point

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Definition of split-off point

Split-off Point Image 1

split-off point

the point at which the outputs of a joint process are first identifiable or can be separated as individual products


Split-off point

The point in a production process when clearly identifiable joint costs
can be identified within the process.



Related Terms:

approximated net realizable value at split-off allocation

a method of allocating joint cost to joint products using a
simulated net realizable value at the split-off point; approximated
value is computed as final sales price minus
incremental separate costs


Basis point

In the bond market, the smallest measure used for quoting yields is a basis point. Each percentage
point of yield in bonds equals 100 basis points. Basis points also are used for interest rates. An interest rate of
5% is 50 basis points greater than an interest rate of 4.5%.


Basis Point

One one-hundredth of one percent


Basis point

One hundredth of one percentage point, or 0.0001.



Basis Point

One one-hundredth of a percentage point, used to express variations in yields. For example, the difference between 5.36 percent and 5.38 percent is 2 basis points.


Bond points

A conventional unit of measure for bond prices set at $10 and equivalent to 1% of the $100 face
value of the bond. A price of 80 means that the bond is selling at 80% of its face, or par value.


Split-off Point Image 2

break-even point (BEP)

the level of activity, in units or dollars, at which total revenues equal total costs


Breakeven point

The point at which total costs equal total revenue, i.e. where there is neither a profit nor a loss.


breakeven point

The annual sales volume level at which total contribution
margin equals total annual fixed expenses. The breakeven point is only a
point of reference, not the goal of a business, of course. It is computed by
dividing total fixed expenses by unit margin. The breakeven point is
quite useful in analyzing profit behavior and operating leverage. Also, it
gives manager a good point of reference for setting sales goals and
understanding the consequences of incurring fixed costs for a period.


Breakeven point

The sales level at which a company, division, or product line makes a
profit of exactly zero, and is computed by dividing all fixed costs by the average
gross margin percentage.


Cash-flow break-even point

The point below which the firm will need either to obtain additional financing
or to liquidate some of its assets to meet its fixed costs.


Delivery points

Those points designated by futures exchanges at which the financial instrument or
commodity covered by a futures contract may be delivered in fulfillment of such contract.


Free-on-Board (FOB) Shipping Point

A shipping arrangement agreed to between buyer and
seller where title to the goods sold passes when the goods in question are delivered to a common
carrier. When goods are shipped FOB shipping point, revenue is properly recognized when the
goods are delivered to the common carrier.


Income Splitting

This is a tax planning strategy of arranging for income to be transferred to family members who are in lower tax brackets than the one earning the income, thus reducing taxes. Even though attribution rules limit income splitting, there are still a number of legitimate ways to do so, such as through the use of spousal RRSPs.


Last split

After a stock split, the number of shares distributed for each share held and the date of the
distribution.


net realizable value at split-off allocation

a method of allocating joint cost to joint products that uses, as the proration base, sales value at split-off minus all costs necessary
to prepare and dispose of the products; it requires
that all joint products be salable at the split-off point


Order penetration point

The point in the production process when a product is
reserved for a specific customer.



order point

the level of inventory that triggers the placement
of an order for additional units; it is determined based
on usage, lead time, and safety stock


Outbound stock point

A designated inventory location on the shop floor between
operations where inventory is stockpiled until needed by the next operation.


Point

The smallest unit of price change quoted or, one one-hundredth of a percent. Related: minimum price
fluctuation and tick.


Point and figure chart

A price-only chart that takes into account only whole integer changes in price, i.e., a
2-point change. point and figure charting disregards the element of time and is solely used to record changes
in price.


Point and figure chart

A financial chart usually used to plot asset price data.
Upward price movements are plotted as X’s and downward price movements
are plotted as O’s.


point of sale (POS)

The terminal at which a customer uses his/her debit card to make a direct payment transaction. See also Interac Direct Payment.


Point-of-use delivery

A delivery of stock to a location in or near the shop floor
adjacent to its area of use.


Point-of-use storage

The storage of stock in a location in or near the shop floor
adjacent to its area of use.


Price value of a basis point (PVBP)

Also called the dollar value of a basis point, a measure of the change in
the price of the bond if the required yield changes by one basis point.


Reverse stock split

A proportionate decrease in the number of shares, but not the value of shares of stock
held by shareholders. Shareholders maintain the same percentage of equity as before the split. For example, a
1-for-3 split would result in stockholders owning 1 share for every 3 shares owned before the split. After the
reverse split, the firm's stock price is, in this example, worth three times the pre-reverse split price. A firm
generally institutes a reverse split to boost its stock's market price and attract investors.



Sales value at split-off

A cost allocation methodology that allocates joint costs to joint
products in proportion to their relative sales values at the split-off point.


sales value at split-off allocation

a method of assigning joint cost to joint products that uses the relative sales values of the products at the split-off point as the proration basis; use of this method requires that all joint products
are salable at the split-off point


Split

Sometimes, companies split their outstanding shares into a larger number of shares. If a company with 1
million shares did a two-for-one split, the company would have 2 million shares. An investor with 100 shares
before the split would hold 200 shares after the split. The investor's percentage of equity in the company
remains the same, and the price of the stock he owns is one-half the price of the stock on the day prior to the split.


Split delivery

The practice of ordering large quantities on a single purchase order,
but separating the order into multiple smaller deliveries.


Split Dollar Life Insurance

The split dollar concept is usually associated with cash value life insurance where there is a death benefit and an accumulation of cash value. The basic premise is the sharing of the costs and benefits of a life insurance policy by two or more parties. Usually one party owns and pays for the insurance protection and the other owns and pays for the cash accumulation. There is no single way to structure a split dollar arrangement. The possible structures are limited only by the imagination of the parties involved.


Split-fee option

An option on an option. The buyer generally executes the split fee with first an initial fee,
with a window period at the end of which upon payment of a second fee the original terms of the option may
be extended to a later predetermined final notification date.


Split-rate tax system

A tax system that taxes retained earnings at a higher rate than earnings that are
distributed as dividends.


Stock split

Occurs when a firm issues new shares of stock but in turn lowers the current market price of its
stock to a level that is proportionate to pre-split prices. For example, if IBM trades at $100 before a 2-for-1
split, after the split it will trade at $50 and holders of the stock will have twice as many shares than they had
before the split. See: split.


stock split

Issue of additional shares to firm’s stockholders.


Stockpoint

An inventory storage area used for short-term inventory staging.


Turning Point

The trough or peak of a business cycle.


incremental separate cost

the cost that is incurred for each
joint product between the split-off point and the point of sale


joint cost

the total of all costs (direct material, direct labor,
and overhead) incurred in a joint process up to the splitoff point



 

 

 

 

 

 

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