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Split-fee option

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Definition of Split-fee option

Split-fee Option Image 1

Split-fee option

An option on an option. The buyer generally executes the split fee with first an initial fee,
with a window period at the end of which upon payment of a second fee the original terms of the option may
be extended to a later predetermined final notification date.



Related Terms:

12B-1 fees

The percent of a mutual fund's assets used to defray marketing and distribution expenses. The
amount of the fee is stated in the fund's prospectus. The SEC has recently proposed that 12B-1 fees in excess
of 0.25% be classed as a load. A true " no load" fund has neither a sales charge nor 12b-1 fee.


Abandonment option

The option of terminating an investment earlier than originally planned.


American option

An option that may be exercised at any time up to and including the expiration date.
Related: European option


American option

An option that can be exercised any time until its
expiration date. Contrast with European option.


American-style option

An option contract that can be exercised at any time between the date of purchase and
the expiration date. Most exchange-traded options are American style.



approximated net realizable value at split-off allocation

a method of allocating joint cost to joint products using a
simulated net realizable value at the split-off point; approximated
value is computed as final sales price minus
incremental separate costs


Arbitrage-free option-pricing models

Yield curve option-pricing models.


Split-fee Option Image 2

Asian option

option based on the average price of the asset during the life of the option.


Back fee

The fee paid on the extension date if the buyer wishes to continue the option.


Bargain-purchase-price option

Gives the lessee the option to purchase the asset at a price below fair market
value when the lease expires.


Barrier options

Contracts with trigger points that, when crossed, automatically generate buying or selling of
other options. These are very exotic options.


Basket options

Packages that involve the exchange of more than two currencies against a base currency at
expiration. The basket option buyer purchases the right, but not the obligation, to receive designated
currencies in exchange for a base currency, either at the prevailing spot market rate or at a prearranged rate of
exchange. A basket option is generally used by multinational corporations with multicurrency cash flows
since it is generally cheaper to buy an option on a basket of currencies than to buy individual options on each
of the currencies that make up the basket.


Binomial option pricing model

An option pricing model in which the underlying asset can take on only two
possible, discrete values in the next time period for each value that it can take on in the preceding time period.


Black-Scholes option-pricing model

A model for pricing call options based on arbitrage arguments that uses
the stock price, the exercise price, the risk-free interest rate, the time to expiration, and the standard deviation
of the stock return.


cafeteria plan a “menu” of fringe benefit options that include

cash or nontaxable benefits


Call an option

To exercise a call option.


Split-fee Option Image 3

Call option

An option contract that gives its holder the right (but not the obligation) to purchase a specified
number of shares of the underlying stock at the given strike price, on or before the expiration date of the
contract.
Call premium
Premium in price above the par value of a bond or share of preferred stock that must be paid to
holders to redeem the bond or share of preferred stock before its scheduled maturity date.


Call Option

A contract that gives the holder the right to buy an asset for a
specified price on or before a given expiration (maturity) date



call option

Right to buy an asset at a specified exercise price on or before the exercise date.


Commitment fee

A fee paid to a commercial bank in return for its legal commitment to lend funds that have
not yet been advanced.


Compound option

option on an option.


Covered or hedge option strategies

Strategies that involve a position in an option as well as a position in the
underlying stock, designed so that one position will help offset any unfavorable price movement in the other,
including covered call writing and protective put buying. Related: naked strategies


Currency option

An option to buy or sell a foreign currency.


Custodial fees Fees

charged by an institution that holds securities in safekeeping for an investor.


Dealer options

Over-the-counter options, such as those offered by government and mortgage-backed
securities dealers.


Delivery options

The options available to the seller of an interest rate futures contract, including the quality
option, the timing option, and the wild card option. Delivery options make the buyer uncertain of which
Treasury Bond will be delivered or when it will be delivered.


Doubling option

A sinking fund provision that may allow repurchase of twice the required number of bonds
at the sinking fund call price.


Split-fee Option Image 4

Down-and-in option

Barrier option that comes into existence if asset price hits a barrier.



Down-and-out option

Barrier option that expires if asset price hits a barrier.


Elasticity of an option

Percentage change in the value of an option given a 1% change in the value of the
option's underlying stock.


Embedded option

An option that is part of the structure of a bond that provides either the bondholder or
issuer the right to take some action against the other party, as opposed to a bare option, which trades
separately from any underlying security.


Equity options

Securities that give the holder the right to buy or sell a specified number of shares of stock, at
a specified price for a certain (limited) time period. Typically one option equals 100 shares of stock.


Escalating Price Option

A nonqualified stock option that uses a sliding scale for
the option price that changes in concert with a peer group index.


European option

option that may be exercised only at the expiration date. Related: american option.


European option

An option that can be exercised only on its expiration date.
Contrast with American option.


European-style option

An option contract that can only be exercised on the expiration date.


Exercising the option

The act buying or selling the underlying asset via the option contract.


Exit Options

A variety of options available to an investor to recover their invested capital and the return on their investment.


Fee

A charge for services.


Feedback

The retrospective process of measuring performance, comparing it with plan and taking corrective action.


Feedforward

The process of determining prospectively whether strategies are likely to achieve the target
results that are consistent with organizational goals.


Foreign currency option

An option that conveys the right to buy or sell a specified amount of foreign
currency at a specified price within a specified time period.


Front End Fees

fees paid when for example a financial instrument such as a loan is arranged.


Front fee

The fee initially paid by the buyer upon entering a split-fee option contract.


Futures option

An option on a futures contract. Related: options on physicals.


Garmen-Kohlhagen option pricing model

A widely used model for pricing foreign currency options.


Greenshoe option

option that allows the underwriter for a new issue to buy and resell additional shares.


Heavenly Parachute Stock Option

A nonqualified stock option that allows a deceased option holder’s estate up to three years in which to exercise his or her
options.


Incentive Stock Option

An option to purchase company stock that is not taxable
to the employee at the time it is granted nor at the time when the employee
eventually exercises the option to buy stock.


Income Splitting

This is a tax planning strategy of arranging for income to be transferred to family members who are in lower tax brackets than the one earning the income, thus reducing taxes. Even though attribution rules limit income splitting, there are still a number of legitimate ways to do so, such as through the use of spousal RRSPs.


Index and Option Market (IOM)

A division of the CME established in 1982 for trading stock index
products and options. Related: Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME).


Index option

A call or put option based on a stock market index.


Interest Option

One of several investment accounts in which your premiums may be invested within your life insurance policy.


Intrinsic value of an option

The amount by which an option is in-the-money. An option which is not in-themoney
has no intrinsic value. Related: in-the-money.


Irrational call option

The implied call imbedded in the MBS. Identified as irrational because the call is
sometimes not exercised when it is in the money (interest rates are below the threshold to refinance).
Sometimes exercised when not in the money (home sold without regard to the relative level of interest rates).


Last split

After a stock split, the number of shares distributed for each share held and the date of the
distribution.


Liquid yield option note (LYON)

Zero-coupon, callable, putable, convertible bond invented by Merrill


Liquid yield option note (LYON)

Zero-coupon, callable, putable, convertible bond invented by Merrill Lynch & Co.


Lookback option

An option that allows the buyer to choose as the option strike price any price of the
underlying asset that has occurred during the life of the option. If a call, the buyer will choose the minimal
price, whereas if a put, the buyer will choose the maximum price. This option will always be in the money.


Management fee

An investment advisory fee charged by the financial advisor to a fund based on the fund's
average assets, but sometimes determined on a sliding scale that declines as the dollar amount of the fund increases.


management fee

The fee paid to the fund’s manager for supervising the administration of the fund.


Margin requirement (Options)

The amount of cash an uncovered (naked) option writer is required to
deposit and maintain to cover his daily position valuation and reasonably foreseeable intra-day price changes.


Multi-option financing facility

A syndicated confirmed credit line with attached options.


Naked option strategies

An unhedged strategy making exclusive use of one of the following: Long call
strategy (buying call options ), short call strategy (selling or writing call options), Long put strategy (buying
put options ), and short put strategy (selling or writing put options). By themselves, these positions are called
naked strategies because they do not involve an offsetting or risk-reducing position in another option or the
underlying security.
Related: covered option strategies.


net realizable value at split-off allocation

a method of allocating joint cost to joint products that uses, as the proration base, sales value at split-off minus all costs necessary
to prepare and dispose of the products; it requires
that all joint products be salable at the split-off point


Nonqualified Stock Option

A stock option not given any favorable tax treatment
under the Internal Revenue Code. The option is taxed when it is exercised,
based on the difference between the option price and the fair market
value of the stock on that day.


Option

Gives the buyer the right, but not the obligation, to buy or sell an asset at a set price on or before a
given date. Investors, not companies, issue options. Investors who purchase call options bet the stock will be
worth more than the price set by the option (the strike price), plus the price they paid for the option itself.
Buyers of put options bet the stock's price will go down below the price set by the option. An option is part of
a class of securities called derivatives, so named because these securities derive their value from the worth of
an underlying investment.


Option

See call option and put option


Option

A right to buy or sell specific securities or commodities at a stated
price (exercise or strike price) within a specified time. An option is a type of
derivative.


Option

Right to buy or sell a specified property at a specified amount at some time in the future.


Option-adjusted spread (OAS)

1) The spread over an issuer's spot rate curve, developed as a measure of
the yield spread that can be used to convert dollar differences between theoretical value and market price.
2) The cost of the implied call embedded in a MBS, defined as additional basis-yield spread. When added to the
base yield spread of an MBS without an operative call produces the option-adjusted spread.


Option elasticity

The percentage increase in an option's value given a 1% change in the value of the
underlying security.


Option not to deliver

In the mortgage pipeline, an additional hedge placed in tandem with the forward or
substitute sale.


Option premium

The option price.


Option price

Also called the option premium, the price paid by the buyer of the options contract for the right
to buy or sell a security at a specified price in the future.


Option seller

Also called the option writer , the party who grants a right to trade a security at a given price in
the future.


Option writer

option seller.


Options contract

A contract that, in exchange for the option price, gives the option buyer the right, but not
the obligation, to buy (or sell) a financial asset at the exercise price from (or to) the option seller within a
specified time period, or on a specified date (expiration date).


Options contract multiple

A constant, set at $100, which when multiplied by the cash index value gives the
dollar value of the stock index underlying an option. That is, dollar value of the underlying stock index = cash
index value x $100 (the options contract multiple).


Options on physicals

Interest rate options written on fixed-income securities, as opposed to those written on
interest rate futures contracts.


Out-of-the-money option

A call option is out-of-the-money if the strike price is greater than the market price
of the underlying security. A put option is out-of-the-money if the strike price is less than the market price of
the underlying security.


Participating fees

The portion of total fees in a syndicated credit that go to the participating banks.


Participation Fee

fee charged by a bank for taking part in providing a loan.


Path dependent option

An option whose value depends on the sequence of prices of the underlying asset
rather than just the final price of the asset.


Policy Fee

This is an administrative fee which is part of most life insurance policies. It ranges from about $40 to as much as $100 per year per policy. It is not a separate fee. It is incorporated in the regular monthly, quarterly, semi-annual or annual payment that you make for your policy. Knowing about this hidden fee is important because some insurance companies offer a policy fee discount on additional policies purchased under certain conditions. Sometimes they reduce the policy fee or waive it altogether on one or more additional policies purchased at the same time and billed to the same address. The rules are slightly different depending on the insurance company. There could be enormous savings if several people in the same family or business were intending to purchase coverage at the same time.


Policy Fee

Administrative charge included in a Policy Premium.


Postponement option

The option of postponing a project without eliminating the possibility of undertaking it.


Put an option

To exercise a put option.


Put option

This security gives investors the right to sell (or put) fixed number of shares at a fixed price within
a given time frame. An investor, for example, might wish to have the right to sell shares of a stock at a certain
price by a certain time in order to protect, or hedge, an existing investment.


Put Option

A contract that gives the holder the right to sell an asset for a
specified price on or before a given expiration (maturity) date


put option

Right to sell an asset at a specified exercise price on or before the exercise date.


Put Option

Contract that grants the right to sell at a specified price at some time in the future.


Quality option

Also called the swap option, the seller's choice of deliverables in Treasury Bond and Treasury
note futures contract. Related: cheapest to deliver issue


real options

options embedded in real assets.


Reverse stock split

A proportionate decrease in the number of shares, but not the value of shares of stock
held by shareholders. Shareholders maintain the same percentage of equity as before the split. For example, a
1-for-3 split would result in stockholders owning 1 share for every 3 shares owned before the split. After the
reverse split, the firm's stock price is, in this example, worth three times the pre-reverse split price. A firm
generally institutes a reverse split to boost its stock's market price and attract investors.


Sales value at split-off

A cost allocation methodology that allocates joint costs to joint
products in proportion to their relative sales values at the split-off point.


sales value at split-off allocation

a method of assigning joint cost to joint products that uses the relative sales values of the products at the split-off point as the proration basis; use of this method requires that all joint products
are salable at the split-off point


Split

Sometimes, companies split their outstanding shares into a larger number of shares. If a company with 1
million shares did a two-for-one split, the company would have 2 million shares. An investor with 100 shares
before the split would hold 200 shares after the split. The investor's percentage of equity in the company
remains the same, and the price of the stock he owns is one-half the price of the stock on the day prior to the split.


Split delivery

The practice of ordering large quantities on a single purchase order,
but separating the order into multiple smaller deliveries.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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