Financial Terms
Paper gain (loss)

Main Page

Alphabetical
Index

SEARCH


Information about financial, finance, business, accounting, payroll, inventory, investment, money, inventory control, stock trading, financial advisor, tax advisor, credit.

 


Main Page: accounting, credit, financial advisor, inventory control, financial, finance, business, stock trading,

Definition of Paper gain (loss)

Paper Gain (loss) Image 1

Paper gain (loss)

Unrealized capital gain (loss) on securities held in portfolio, based on a comparison of
current market price to original cost.



Related Terms:

Annualized gain

If stock X appreciates 1.5% in one month, the annualized gain for that sock over a twelve
month period is 12*1.5% = 18%. Compounded over the twelve month period, the gain is (1.015)^12 = 19.6%.


Bargain-purchase-price option

Gives the lessee the option to purchase the asset at a price below fair market
value when the lease expires.


Base probability of loss

The probability of not achieving a portfolio expected return.


Capital gain

When a stock is sold for a profit, it's the difference between the net sales price of securities and
their net cost, or original basis. If a stock is sold below cost, the difference is a capital loss.


Capital gain

The gain recognized on the sale of a capital item (fixed asset), calculated
by subtracting its sale price from its original purchase price (less the impact of any
associated depreciation).



Capital Gain

An increase in the value of an asset.


capital gain

The positive difference between the adjusted cost base of an investment held as a capital property and the proceeds of disposition you receive when you sell it. When you sell such an investment for more than you paid, you realize a capital gain.


Paper Gain (loss) Image 2

Capital gains yield

The price change portion of a stock's return.


Capital loss

The difference between the net cost of a security and the net sale price, if that security is sold at a loss.


capital loss

The negative difference between the adjusted cost base of an investment held as a capital property and the proceeds of disposition you receive when you sell it. When you sell such an investment for less than you paid, you incur a capital loss.


Capitalized Cost An expenditure or accrual that is reported as an asset to be amortized against

future-period revenue.


Commercial paper

Short-term unsecured promissory notes issued by a corporation. The maturity of
commercial paper is typically less than 270 days; the most common maturity range is 30 to 50 days or less.


commercial paper

Short-term unsecured notes issued by firms.


continuous loss

any reduction in units that occurs uniformly
throughout a production process


Credit Loss

A loan receivable that has proven uncollectible and is written off.


Direct paper

Commercial paper sold directly by the issuer to investors.


Paper Gain (loss) Image 3

discrete loss

a reduction in units that occurs at a specific
point in a production process


Euro-commercial paper

Short-term notes with maturities up to 360 days that are issued by companies in
international money markets.



Extraordinary Gain or Loss

gains and losses that are judged to be both unusual and nonrecurring.


extraordinary gains and losses

No pun intended, but these types of gains
and losses are extraordinarily important to understand. These are nonrecurring,
onetime, unusual, nonoperating gains or losses that are
recorded by a business during the period. The amount of each of these
gains or losses, net of the income tax effect, is reported separately in the
income statement. Net income is reported before and after these gains
and losses. These gains and losses should not be recorded very often, but
in fact many businesses record them every other year or so, causing
much consternation to investors. In addition to evaluating the regular
stream of sales and expenses that produce operating profit, investors
also have to factor into their profit performance analysis the perturbations
of these irregular gains and losses reported by a business.


Gain

The profit earned on the sale of an asset, computed by subtracting its book value
from the revenue received from its sale.


Gain-on-Sale Accounting

Up-front gain recognized from the securitization and sale of a pool
of loans. Profit is recorded for the excess of the sales price and the present value of the estimated
interest income that is expected to be received on the loans above the amounts funded on the loans
and the present value of the interest agreed to be paid to the buyers of the loan-backed securities.


Impairment Loss

A special, nonrecurring charge taken to write down an asset with an overstated
book value. Generally an asset is considered to be value-impaired when its book value
exceeds the future net cash flows expected to be received from its use. An impairment write-down
reduces an overstated book value to fair value.


Job Loss Insurance (Credit Insurance)

Coverage that can pay down your debt should you become involuntarily unemployed. The payment is made to your creditors to reduce your debt owing.


loss

an expired cost that was unintentionally incurred; a cost
that does not relate to the generation of revenues


Loss

An excess of expenses over revenues, either for a single business transaction or in
reference to the sum of all transactions for an accounting period.


Loss carryback

The offsetting of a current year loss against the reported taxable
income of previous years.


Loss carryforward

The offsetting of a current year loss against the reported taxable
income for future years.



Net operating losses

losses that a firm can take advantage of to reduce taxes.


normal loss

an expected decline in units during the production process


Paper

Money market instruments, commercial paper and other.


Profit and Loss account

A financial statement measuring the profit or loss of a business – income less expenses – for an accounting period.


profit and loss statement (P&L statement)

This is an alternative moniker
for an income statement or for an internal management profit report.
Actually, it’s a misnomer because a business has either a profit or a loss
for a period. Accordingly, it should be profit or loss statement, but the
term has caught on and undoubtedly will continue to be profit and loss
statement.


Realized Gains and Losses

Increases or decreases in the fair value of an asset or a liability that
are realized through sale or settlement.


Residual losses

Lost wealth of the shareholders due to divergent behavior of the managers.


Stop-loss order

An order to sell a stock when the price falls to a specified level.


Trading paper

CDs purchased by accounts that are likely to resell them. The term is commonly used in the Euromarket.


basic earnings per share (EPS)

This important ratio equals the net
income for a period (usually one year) divided by the number capital
stock shares issued by a business corporation. This ratio is so important
for publicly owned business corporations that it is included in the daily
stock trading tables published by the Wall Street Journal, the New York
Times, and other major newspapers. Despite being a rather straightforward
concept, there are several technical problems in calculating
earnings per share. Actually, two EPS ratios are needed for many businesses—
basic EPS, which uses the actual number of capital shares outstanding,
and diluted EPS, which takes into account additional shares of
stock that may be issued for stock options granted by a business and
other stock shares that a business is obligated to issue in the future.
Also, many businesses report not one but two net income figures—one
before extraordinary gains and losses were recorded in the period and a
second after deducting these nonrecurring gains and losses. Many business
corporations issue more than one class of capital stock, which
makes the calculation of their earnings per share even more complicated.



 

 

 

 

 

 

Related to : financial, finance, business, accounting, payroll, inventory, investment, money, inventory control, stock trading, financial advisor, tax advisor, credit.


Copyright© 2019 www.finance-lib.com