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Definition of Short bonds

Short Bonds Image 1

Short bonds

bonds with short current maturities.



Related Terms:

Bonds payable

Amounts owed by the company that have been formalized by a legal document called a bond.


Brady bonds

bonds issued by emerging countries under a debt reduction plan.


Canada Savings Bonds

A bond issued each year by the federal government. These bonds can be cashed in at any time for their full face value.


Collateral trust bonds

A bond in which the issuer (often a holding company) grants investors a lien on
stocks, notes, bonds, or other financial asset as security. Compare mortgage bond.


Convertible bonds

bonds that can be converted into common stock at the option of the holder.



Corporate bonds

Debt obligations issued by corporations.


Cushion bonds

High-coupon bonds that sell at only at a moderate premium because they are callable at a
price below that at which a comparable non-callable bond would sell. Cushion bonds offer considerable
downside protection in a falling market.


Short Bonds Image 2

Dollar bonds

Municipal revenue bonds for which quotes are given in dollar prices. Not to be confused with
"U.S. Dollar" bonds, a common term of reference in the Eurobond market.


Eurodollar bonds

Eurobonds denominated in U.S.dollars.


Euroyen bonds

Eurobonds denominated in Japanese yen.


General obligation bonds

Municipal securities secured by the issuer's pledge of its full faith, credit, and
taxing power.


Global bonds

bonds that are designed so as to qualify for immediate trading in any domestic capital market
and in the Euromarket.


International bonds

A collective term that refers to global bonds, Eurobonds, and foreign bonds.


Investment grade bonds

A bond that is assigned a rating in the top four categories by commercial credit
rating companies. For example, S&P classifies investment grade bonds as BBB or higher, and Moodys'
classifies investment grade bonds as Ba or higher. Related: High-yield bond.


Long bonds

bonds with a long current maturity. The "long bond" is the 30-year U.S. government bond.


Long bonds

bonds with a long current maturity. The "long bond" is the 30-year U.S. government bond.


Short Bonds Image 3

Selling short

If an investor thinks the price of a stock is going down, the investor could borrow the stock from
a broker and sell it. Eventually, the investor must buy the stock back on the open market. For instance, you
borrow 1000 shares of XYZ on July 1 and sell it for $8 per share. Then, on Aug 1, you purchase 1000 shares
of XYZ at $7 per share. You've made $1000 (less commissions and other fees) by selling short.


Serial bonds

Corporate bonds arranged so that specified principal amounts become due on specified dates.
Related: term bonds.



Short

One who has sold a contract to establish a market position and who has not yet closed out this position
through an offsetting purchase; the opposite of a long position. Related: Long.


Short book

See: unmatched book.


Short hedge

The sale of a futures contract(s) to eliminate or lessen the possible decline in value ownership of
an approximately equal amount of the actual financial instrument or physical commodity.
Related: Long hedge.


Short interest

This is the total number of shares of a security that investors have borrowed, then sold in the
hope that the security will fall in value. An investor then buys back the shares and pockets the difference as profit.


Short position

Occurs when a person sells stocks he or she does not yet own. Shares must be borrowed,
before the sale, to make "good delivery" to the buyer. Eventually, the shares must be bought to close out the
transaction. This technique is used when an investor believes the stock price will go down.


short position

The sale of an investment, particularly by someone who does not yet own it.


Short rate

The annualized one-period interest rate.


Short-run operating activities

Events and decisions concerning the short-term finance of a firm, such as
how much inventory to order and whether to offer cash terms or credit terms to customers.


Short sale

Selling a security that the seller does not own but is committed to repurchasing eventually. It is
used to capitalize on an expected decline in the security's price.


Short sale, short position

The sale of a security or financial instrument not
owned, in anticipation of a price decline and making a profit by purchasing the
instrument later at a lower price, and then delivering the instrument to
complete the sale. See Long position.



Short selling

Establishing a market position by selling a security one does not own in anticipation of the price
of that security falling.


Short squeeze

A situation in which a lack of supply tends to force prices upward.


Short straddle

A straddle in which one put and one call are sold.


Short-term financial plan

A financial plan that covers the coming fiscal year.


Short-term investment services

Services that assist firms in making short-term investments.


Short-term solvency ratios

Ratios used to judge the adequacy of liquid assets for meeting short-term
obligations as they come due, including
1) the current ratio,
2) the acid-test ratio,
3) the inventory turnover ratio, and
4) the accounts receivable turnover ratio.


Short-term tax exempts

short-term securities issued by states, municipalities, local housing agencies, and
urban renewal agencies.


Shortage cost

Costs that fall with increases in the level of investment in current assets.


shortage costs

Costs incurred from shortages in current assets.


Shortfall risk

The risk of falling short of any investment target.


Term bonds

Often referred to as bullet-maturity bonds or simply bullet bonds, bonds whose principal is
payable at maturity. Related: serial bonds


Treasury bonds

Debt obligations of the U.S. Treasury that have maturities of 10 years or more.


Yankee bonds

Foreign bonds denominated in US$ issued in the United States by foreign banks and
corporations. These bonds are usually registered with the SEC. For example, bonds issued by originators with
roots in Japan are called Samurai bonds.


bond

A debt security issued by a government or company. You receive regular interest payments at specified rates while you hold the bond and you receive the face value when it matures. short-term bonds mature in less than five years; medium-term bonds mature in six to ten years; and long-term bonds mature in eleven years or greater.


Local expectations theory

A form of the pure expectations theory which suggests that the returns on bonds
of different maturities will be the same over a short-term investment horizon.


Money Market

A financial market in which short-term (maturity of less than a year) debt instruments such as bonds are traded.


Return-to-maturity expectations

A variant of pure expectations theory which suggests that the return that an
investor will realize by rolling over short-term bonds to some investment horizon will be the same as holding
a zero-coupon bond with a maturity that is the same as that investment horizon.


Term premiums

Excess of the yields to maturity on long-term bonds over those of short-term bonds.


Term repo

A repurchase agreement with a term of more than one day.
Term structure of interest rates
Relationship between interest rates on bonds of different maturities usually
depicted in the form of a graph often depicted as a yield curve. Harvey shows that inverted term structures
(long rates below short rates) have preceded every recession over the past 30 years.


Yield curve

The graphical depiction of the relationship between the yield on bonds of the same credit quality
but different maturities. Related: Term structure of interest rates. Harvey (1991) finds that the inversions of
the yield curve (short-term rates greater than long term rates) have preceded the last five U.S. recessions. The
yield curve can accurately forecast the turning points of the business cycle.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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