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Collateral trust bonds

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Definition of Collateral trust bonds

Collateral Trust Bonds Image 1

Collateral trust bonds

A bond in which the issuer (often a holding company) grants investors a lien on
stocks, notes, bonds, or other financial asset as security. Compare mortgage bond.



Related Terms:

Mortgage bond

A bond in which the issuer has granted the bondholders a lien against the pledged assets.
collateral trust bonds


Subordinated debenture bond

An unsecured bond that ranks after secured debt, after debenture bonds, and
often after some general creditors in its claim on assets and earnings. Related: Debenture bond, mortgage
bond, collateral trust bonds.


Bonds payable

Amounts owed by the company that have been formalized by a legal document called a bond.


Brady bonds

bonds issued by emerging countries under a debt reduction plan.


Canada Savings Bonds

A bond issued each year by the federal government. These bonds can be cashed in at any time for their full face value.



Collateral

Assets than can be repossessed if a borrower defaults.


Collateral

Assets that are used to secure a loan.


Collateral Trust Bonds Image 2

collateral

A pledge of property or other assets by a customer who is borrowing from a financial institution. Financial institutions require collateral as security in the event that the customer defaults on his/her loan.


Collateralized mortgage obligation (CMO)

A security backed by a pool of pass-throughs , structured so that
there are several classes of bondholders with varying maturities, called tranches. The principal payments from
the underlying pool of pass-through securities are used to retire the bonds on a priority basis as specified in
the prospectus.
Related: mortgage pass-through security


Convertible bonds

bonds that can be converted into common stock at the option of the holder.


Corporate bonds

Debt obligations issued by corporations.


Cushion bonds

High-coupon bonds that sell at only at a moderate premium because they are callable at a
price below that at which a comparable non-callable bond would sell. Cushion bonds offer considerable
downside protection in a falling market.


Deed of trust

Indenture.


Depository Trust Company (DTC)

DTC is a user-owned securities depository which accepts deposits of
eligible securities for custody, executes book-entry deliveries and records book-entry pledges of securities in
its custody, and provides for withdrawals of securities from its custody.


Dollar bonds

Municipal revenue bonds for which quotes are given in dollar prices. Not to be confused with
"U.S. Dollar" bonds, a common term of reference in the Eurobond market.


Equipment trust certificates

Certificates issued by a trust that was formed to purchase an asset and lease it
to a lessee. When the last of the certificates has been repaid, title of ownership of the asset reverts to the
lessee.


Eurodollar bonds

Eurobonds denominated in U.S.dollars.


Euroyen bonds

Eurobonds denominated in Japanese yen.



General obligation bonds

Municipal securities secured by the issuer's pledge of its full faith, credit, and
taxing power.


Global bonds

bonds that are designed so as to qualify for immediate trading in any domestic capital market
and in the Euromarket.


Grantor trust

A mechanism of issuing MBS wherein the mortgages' collateral is deposited with a trustee
under a custodial or trust agreement.


International bonds

A collective term that refers to global bonds, Eurobonds, and foreign bonds.


Investment grade bonds

A bond that is assigned a rating in the top four categories by commercial credit
rating companies. For example, S&P classifies investment grade bonds as BBB or higher, and Moodys'
classifies investment grade bonds as Ba or higher. Related: High-yield bond.


Investment trust

A closed-end fund regulated by the Investment Company Act of 1940. These funds have a
fixed number of shares which are traded on the secondary markets similarly to corporate stocks. The market
price may exceed the net asset value per share, in which case it is considered at a "premium." When the
market price falls below the NAV/share, it is at a "discount." Many closed-end funds are of a specialized
nature, with the portfolio representing a particular industry, country, etc. These funds are usually listed on US
and foreign exchanges.


Long bonds

bonds with a long current maturity. The "long bond" is the 30-year U.S. government bond.


Long bonds

bonds with a long current maturity. The "long bond" is the 30-year U.S. government bond.


Personal trust

An interest in an asset held by a trustee for the benefit of another person.


REIT (real estate investment trust)

Real estate investment trust, which is similar to a closed-end mutual
fund. REITs invest in real estate or loans secured by real estate and issue shares in such investments.



Serial bonds

Corporate bonds arranged so that specified principal amounts become due on specified dates.
Related: term bonds.


Short bonds

bonds with short current maturities.


Term bonds

Often referred to as bullet-maturity bonds or simply bullet bonds, bonds whose principal is
payable at maturity. Related: serial bonds


Term trust

A closed-end fund that has a fixed termination or maturity date.


Treasury bonds

Debt obligations of the U.S. Treasury that have maturities of 10 years or more.


Trust Company

Organization usually combined with a commercial bank, which is engaged as a trustee for individuals or businesses in the administration of trust funds, estates, custodial arrangements, stock transfer and registration, and other related services.


Trust deed

Agreement between trustee and borrower setting out terms of bond.


Trust receipt

Receipt for goods that are to be held in trust for the lender.


Unit investment trust

Money invested in a portfolio whose composition is fixed for the life of the fund.
Shares in a unit trust are called redeemable trust certificates, and they are sold at a premium above net asset value.


Yankee bonds

Foreign bonds denominated in US$ issued in the United States by foreign banks and
corporations. These bonds are usually registered with the SEC. For example, bonds issued by originators with
roots in Japan are called Samurai bonds.


Debenture bond

An unsecured bond whose holder has the claim of a general creditor on all assets of the
issuer not pledged specifically to secure other debt. Compare subordinated debenture bond, and collateral
trust bonds.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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