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Definition of International bonds

International Bonds Image 1

International bonds

A collective term that refers to global bonds, Eurobonds, and foreign bonds.



Related Terms:

Bank for International Settlements (BIS)

An international bank headquartered in Basel, Switzerland, which
serves as a forum for monetary cooperation among several European central banks, the Bank of Japan, and the
U.S. Federal Reserve System. Founded in 1930 to handle the German payment of World War I reparations, it
now monitors and collects data on international banking activity and promulgates rules concerning
international bank regulation.


Bonds payable

Amounts owed by the company that have been formalized by a legal document called a bond.


Brady bonds

bonds issued by emerging countries under a debt reduction plan.


Canada Savings Bonds

A bond issued each year by the federal government. These bonds can be cashed in at any time for their full face value.


Collateral trust bonds

A bond in which the issuer (often a holding company) grants investors a lien on
stocks, notes, bonds, or other financial asset as security. Compare mortgage bond.



Convertible bonds

bonds that can be converted into common stock at the option of the holder.


Corporate bonds

Debt obligations issued by corporations.


International Bonds Image 2

Cushion bonds

High-coupon bonds that sell at only at a moderate premium because they are callable at a
price below that at which a comparable non-callable bond would sell. Cushion bonds offer considerable
downside protection in a falling market.


Dollar bonds

Municipal revenue bonds for which quotes are given in dollar prices. Not to be confused with
"U.S. Dollar" bonds, a common term of reference in the Eurobond market.


Domestic International Sales Corporation (DISC)

A U.S. corporation that receives a tax incentive for
export activities.


Eurodollar bonds

Eurobonds denominated in U.S.dollars.


Euroyen bonds

Eurobonds denominated in Japanese yen.


General obligation bonds

Municipal securities secured by the issuer's pledge of its full faith, credit, and
taxing power.


Global bonds

bonds that are designed so as to qualify for immediate trading in any domestic capital market
and in the Euromarket.


International Bank for Reconstruction and Development - IBRD or World Bank

international Bank for Reconstruction and Development makes loans at nearly conventional terms to countries for projects of high
economic priority.


International Banking Facility (IBF)

international Banking Facility. A branch that an American bank
establishes in the United States to do Eurocurrency business.


International Bonds Image 3

International Depository Receipt (IDR)

A receipt issued by a bank as evidence of ownership of one or more
shares of the underlying stock of a foreign corporation that the bank holds in trust. The advantage of the IDR
structure is that the corporation does not have to comply with all the regulatory issuing requirements of the
foreign country where the stock is to be traded. The U.S. version of the IDR is the American Depository
Receipt (ADR).


International diversification

The attempt to reduce risk by investing in the more than one nation. By
diversifying across nations whose economic cycles are not perfectly correlated, investors can typically reduce
the variability of their returns.



International finance subsidiary

A subsidiary incorporated in the U.S., usually in Delaware, whose sole
purpose was to issue debentures overseas and invest the proceeds in foreign operations, with the interest paid
to foreign bondholders not subject to U.S. withholding tax. The elimination of the corporate withholding tax
has ended the need for this type of subsidiary.


International Fisher effect

States that the interest rate differential between two countries should be an
unbiased predictor of the future change in the spot rate.


international Fisher effect

Theory that real interest rates in all countries should be equal, with differences in nominal rates reflecting differences in expected inflation.


International fund

A mutual fund that can invest only outside the United States.


international fund

A mutual fund that can invest in securities issued anywhere outside of Canada.


International market

Related: See external market.


International Monetary Fund

An organization founded in 1944 to oversee exchange arrangements of
member countries and to lend foreign currency reserves to members with short-term balance of payment
problems.


International Monetary Fund (IMF)

Organization originally established to manage the postwar fixed exchange rate system.


International Monetary Market (IMM)

A division of the CME established in 1972 for trading financial
futures. Related: Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME).


International Reserves

See foreign exchange reserves.



Investment grade bonds

A bond that is assigned a rating in the top four categories by commercial credit
rating companies. For example, S&P classifies investment grade bonds as BBB or higher, and Moodys'
classifies investment grade bonds as Ba or higher. Related: High-yield bond.


London International Financial Futures Exchange (LIFFE)

A London exchange where Eurodollar futures
as well as futures-style options are traded.


London International Financial Futures Exchange (LIFFE)

London exchange where Eurodollar futures as well as futures-style options are traded.


Long bonds

bonds with a long current maturity. The "long bond" is the 30-year U.S. government bond.


Long bonds

bonds with a long current maturity. The "long bond" is the 30-year U.S. government bond.


Serial bonds

Corporate bonds arranged so that specified principal amounts become due on specified dates.
Related: term bonds.


Short bonds

bonds with short current maturities.


SIMEX (Singapore International Monetary Exchange)

A leading futures and options exchange in Singapore.


Term bonds

Often referred to as bullet-maturity bonds or simply bullet bonds, bonds whose principal is
payable at maturity. Related: serial bonds


Treasury bonds

Debt obligations of the U.S. Treasury that have maturities of 10 years or more.


Yankee bonds

Foreign bonds denominated in US$ issued in the United States by foreign banks and
corporations. These bonds are usually registered with the SEC. For example, bonds issued by originators with
roots in Japan are called Samurai bonds.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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