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EBITA

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Definition of EBITA

EBITA Image 1

EBITA

Earnings before interest, taxes, and amortization expense.



Related Terms:

Abusive Earnings Management

The use of various forms of gimmickry to distort a company's true financial performance in order to achieve a desired result.


Abusive Earnings Management

A characterization used by the Securities and Exchange
Commission to designate Earnings management that results in an intentional and material misrepresentation
of results.


Accounting earnings

Earnings of a firm as reported on its income statement.


Accrued expenses payable

expenses that have to be recorded in order for the financial statements to be accurate. Accrued expenses usually do not involve the receipt of an invoice from the company providing the goods or services.


accrued expenses payable

The account that records the short-term, noninterest-
bearing liabilities of a business that accumulate over time, such
as vacation pay owed to employees. This liability is different than
accounts payable, which is the liability account for bills that have been
received by a business from purchases on credit.



Accrued interest

The accumulated coupon interest earned but not yet paid to the seller of a bond by the
buyer (unless the bond is in default).


Accrued Interest

The amount of interest accumulated on a debt security between
interest paying dates


EBITA Image 1

Accrued Interest

The amount of interest owing but not paid.


Adjusted Earnings

Net income adjusted to exclude selected nonrecurring and noncash items of reserve, gain, expense, and loss.


Amortization

The repayment of a loan by installments.


Amortization

See depreciation, but usually in relation to assets attached to leased property.


amortization

This term has two quite different meanings. First, it may
refer to the allocation to expense each period of the total cost of an
intangible asset (such as the cost of a patent purchased from the inventor)
over its useful economic life. In this sense amortization is equivalent
to depreciation, which allocates the cost of a tangible long-term operating
asset (such as a machine) over its useful economic life. Second, amortization
may refer to the gradual paydown of the principal amount of a debt.
Principal refers to the amount borrowed that has to be paid back to the
lender as opposed to interest that has to be paid for use of the principal.
Each period, a business may pay interest and also make a payment on
the principal of the loan, which reduces the principal amount of the loan,
of course. In this situation the loan is amortized, or gradually paid down.


Amortization

Reduction in value of an asset over some period for accounting
purposes. Generally used with intangible assets. Depreciation is the term used
with fixed or tangible assets.


Amortization

The write-off of an asset over the period when the asset is used. This term
is most commonly applied to the gradual write-down of intangible items, such as
goodwill or organizational costs.


Amortization

The systematic and rational allocation of capitalized costs over their useful lives.
Refer also to depreciation and depletion.


Amortization

The reduction of debt by regular payments of interest and principal sufficient to pay off a loan by maturity.


EBITA Image 2

amortization

The repayment of a loan by installments.


Amortization (Credit Insurance)

Refers to the reduction of debt by regular payments of interest and principal in order to pay off a loan by maturity.



Amortization factor

The pool factor implied by the scheduled amortization assuming no prepayemts.


Amortization Schedule

A schedule that shows precisely how a loan will be repaid. The schedule gives the required payment on each specific date and shows how much of it constitutes interest and how much constitutes repayments of principal.


Amortizing interest rate swap

Swap in which the principal or national amount rises (falls) as interest rates
rise (decline).


Annual fund operating expenses

For investment companies, the management fee and "other expenses,"
including the expenses for maintaining shareholder records, providing shareholders with financial statements,
and providing custodial and accounting services. For 12b-1 funds, selling and marketing costs are included.


Asymmetric taxes

A situation wherein participants in a transaction have different net tax rates.


Average Amortization Period

The average useful life of a company's collective amortizable asset base.


Base interest rate

Related: Benchmark interest rate.


basic earnings per share (EPS)

This important ratio equals the net
income for a period (usually one year) divided by the number capital
stock shares issued by a business corporation. This ratio is so important
for publicly owned business corporations that it is included in the daily
stock trading tables published by the Wall Street Journal, the New York
Times, and other major newspapers. Despite being a rather straightforward
concept, there are several technical problems in calculating
Earnings per share. Actually, two EPS ratios are needed for many businesses—
basic EPS, which uses the actual number of capital shares outstanding,
and diluted EPS, which takes into account additional shares of
stock that may be issued for stock options granted by a business and
other stock shares that a business is obligated to issue in the future.
Also, many businesses report not one but two net income figures—one
before extraordinary gains and losses were recorded in the period and a
second after deducting these nonrecurring gains and losses. Many business
corporations issue more than one class of capital stock, which
makes the calculation of their Earnings per share even more complicated.


Basic Earnings Power Ratio

Percentage of Earnings relative to total assets; indication of how
effectively assets are used to generate Earnings. It is calculated by
dividing Earnings before interest and taxes by the book value of all
assets.


EBITA Image 3

Before-tax profit margin

The ratio of net income before taxes to net sales.



Benchmark interest rate

Also called the base interest rate, it is the minimum interest rate investors will
demand for investing in a non-Treasury security. It is also tied to the yield to maturity offered on a
comparable-maturity Treasury security that was most recently issued ("on-the-run").


Best-interests-of-creditors test

The requirement that a claim holder voting against a plan of reorganization
must receive at least as much as he would have if the debtor were liquidated.


Capitalized interest

interest that is not immediately expensed, but rather is considered as an asset and is then
amortized through the income statement over time.


Capitalized Interest

interest incurred during the construction period on monies invested in
assets under construction that is added to the cost of the assets.


Cash flow after interest and taxes

Net income plus depreciation.


Compound interest

interest paid on previously earned interest as well as on the principal.


Compound Interest

interest paid on principal and on interest earned in previous
periods


compound interest

a method of determining interest in which interest that was earned in prior periods is added to the original investment so that, in each successive period, interest is earned on both principal and interest


compound interest

interest earned on interest.


Compound Interest

interest earned on an investment at periodic intervals and added to principal and previous interest earned. Each time new interest earned is calculated it is on a combined total of principal and previous interest earned. Essentially, interest is paid on top of interest.


Core Earnings

A measure of Earnings that includes only the results of the primary operating
activities of the firm. It is most common to see the measure used by financial firms.


Cost Plus Estimated Earnings in Excess of Billings

Revenue recognized to date under the percentage-of-completion method in excess of amounts billed. Also known as unbilled accounts
receivable.


Covered interest arbitrage

A portfolio manager invests dollars in an instrument denominated in a foreign
currency and hedges his resulting foreign exchange risk by selling the proceeds of the investment forward for
dollars.


Current Income Tax Expense

That portion of the total income tax provision that is based on
taxable income.


Daily Interest Accumulation

Account in which interest is accrued daily and credited to the account at the end of a specified time.


Deferred Income Tax Expense

That portion of the total income tax provision that is the result
of current-period originations and reversals of temporary differences.


Deferred taxes

A non-cash expense that provides a source of free cash flow. Amount allocated during the
period to cover tax liabilities that have not yet been paid.


Depreciation expense

An expense account that represents the portion of the cost of an asset that is being charged to expense during the current period.


diluted earnings per share (EPS)

This measure of Earnings per share
recognizes additional stock shares that may be issued in the future for
stock options and as may be required by other contracts a business has
entered into, such as convertible features in its debt securities and preferred
stock. Both basic Earnings per share and, if applicable, diluted
Earnings per share are reported by publicly owned business corporations.
Often the two EPS figures are not far apart, but in some cases the
gap is significant. Privately owned businesses do not have to report Earnings
per share. See also basic Earnings per share.


Earnings

Net income for the company during the period.


Earnings

In general, refers to a company's total sales less cost of sales and operating expenses, including interest and income tax.


earnings before interest and income tax (EBIT)

A measure of profit that
equals sales revenue for the period minus cost-of-goods-sold expense
and all operating expenses—but before deducting interest and income
tax expenses. It is a measure of the operating profit of a business before
considering the cost of its debt capital and income tax.


Earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT)

A financial measure defined as revenues less cost of goods sold
and selling, general, and administrative expenses. In other words, operating and non-operating profit before
the deduction of interest and income taxes.


Earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT)

The operating profit before deducting interest and tax.


Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA)

The operating profit before deducting interest, tax, depreciation and amortization.


Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation, and Amortization (EBITDA)

An Earningsbased measure that, for many, serves as a surrogate for cash flow. Actually consists of working
capital provided by operations before interest and taxes.


Earnings Management

The active manipulation of Earnings toward a predetermined target.
That target may be one set by management, a forecast made by analysts, or an amount that is consistent
with a smoother, more sustainable Earnings stream. Often, although not always, Earnings
management entails taking steps to reduce and “store” profits during good years for use during
slower years. This more limited form of Earnings management is known as income smoothing.


Earnings per Share

A measure of the Earnings generated by a company on a per
share basis. It is calculated by dividing income available for
distribution to shareholders by the number of common shares
outstanding.


Earnings per share (EPS)

EPS, as it is called, is a company's profit divided by its number of outstanding
shares. If a company earned $2 million in one year had 2 million shares of stock outstanding, its EPS would
be $1 per share. The company often uses a weighted average of shares outstanding over the reporting term.


earnings per share (EPS)

See basic Earnings per share and diluted Earnings per share.


Earnings per share of common stock

How much profit a company made on each share of common stock this year.


Earnings retention ratio

Plowback rate.


Earnings surprises

Positive or negative differences from the consensus forecast of Earnings by institutions
such as First Call or IBES. Negative Earnings surprises generally have a greater adverse affect on stock prices
than the reciprocal positive Earnings surprise on stock prices.


Earnings yield

The ratio of Earnings per share after allowing for tax and interest payments on fixed interest
debt, to the current share price. The inverse of the price/Earnings ratio. It's the Total Twelve Months Earnings
divided by number of outstanding shares, divided by the recent price, multiplied by 100. The end result is
shown in percentage.


EBBS - Earnings before the bad stuff

An acronym attributed to a member of the Securities and
Exchange Commission staff. The reference is to Earnings that have been heavily adjusted to
remove a wide range of nonrecurring, nonoperating, and noncash items.


EBDDT - Earnings before depreciation and deferred taxes

This measure is used principally by
firms in the real estate industry, with the exception of real estate investment trusts, which typically
do not pay taxes.


Economic earnings

The real flow of cash that a firm could pay out forever in the absence of any change in
the firm's productive capacity.


Effective annual interest rate

An annual measure of the time value of money that fully reflects the effects of
compounding.


effective annual interest rate

interest rate that is annualized using compound interest.


Effective Interest Rate

The rate of interest actually earned on an investment. It is
calculated as the ratio of the total amount of interest actually
earned for one year divided by the amount of the principal.


Equilibrium rate of interest

The interest rate that clears the market. Also called the market-clearing interest
rate.


Expense

The reduction in value of an asset as it is used for current company operations.


Expense ratio

The percentage of the assets that were spent to run a mutual fund (as of the last annual
statement). This includes expenses such as management and advisory fees, overhead costs and 12b-1
(distribution and advertising ) fees. The expense ratio does not include brokerage costs for trading the
portfolio, although these are reported as a percentage of assets to the SEC by the funds in a Statement of
Additional Information (SAI). the SAI is available to shareholders on request. Neither the expense ratio or the
SAI includes the transaction costs of spreads, normally incurred in unlisted securities and foreign stocks.
These two costs can add significantly to the reported expenses of a fund. The expense ratio is often termed an
Operating expense Ratio (OER).


Expensed

Charged to an expense account, fully reducing reported profit of that year, as is appropriate for
expenditures for items with useful lives under one year.


Expenses

The costs incurred in buying, making or producing goods and services.


Expenses

Costs involved in running the company.


Extended Amortization Period

An amortization period that continues beyond a long-lived asset's economic useful life.


Extended Amortization Periods

Amortizing capitalized expenditures over estimated useful lives that are unduly optimistic.


Fixed Expenses

Cost of doing business which does not change with the volume of business. Examples might be rent for business premises, insurance payments, heat and light.


fixed expenses (costs)

expenses or costs that remain the same in amount,
or fixed, over the short run and do not vary with changes in sales volume
or sales revenue or other measures of business activity. Over the
longer run, however, these costs increase or decrease as the business
grows or declines. Fixed operating costs provide capacity to carry on
operations and make sales. Fixed manufacturing overhead costs provide
production capacity. Fixed expenses are a key pivot point for the analysis
of profit behavior, especially for determining the breakeven point and for
analyzing strategies to improve profit performance.


Fixed Interest Rate

A rate that does not fluctuate with general market conditions.


Floating Interest Rate

A rate that fluctuates with general market condition.


Forward interest rate

interest rate fixed today on a loan to be made at some future date.


fractional interest discount

the combined discounts for lack of control and marketability. g the constant growth rate in cash flows or net income used in the ADF, Gordon model, or present value factor.


Fully diluted earnings per shares

Earnings per share expressed as if all outstanding convertible securities
and warrants have been exercised.


GENERAL-AND-ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

What was spent to run the non-sales and non-manufacturing part of a company, such as office salaries and interest paid on loans.


Gross interest

interest earned before taxes are deducted.


Guaranteed Interest Annuity (GIA)

interest bearing investment with fixed rate and term.


Guaranteed Interest Certificate (GIC)

interest bearing investment with fixed rate and term.


Income Tax Expense

See income tax provision.


Indirect Taxes

taxes paid by consumers when they buy goods and services. A sales tax is an example.


Insurable Interest

In England in the 1700's it was popular to bet on the date of death of certain prominent public figures. Anyone could buy life insurance on another's life, even without their consent. Unfortunately, some died before it was their time, dispatched prematurely in order that the life insurance proceeds could be collected. In 1774, English Parliament passed a law which restricted the right to be a beneficiary on a life insurance contract to those who would suffer an economic loss when the life insured died. The law also provided that a person has an unlimited insurable interest in his own life. It is still a legal stipulation that an insurance contract is not valid unless insurable interest exists at the time the policy is issued. Life Insurance companies will not, however, issue unlimited amounts of coverage to an individual. The amount of life insurance which will be approved has to approximate the loss caused by the death of the individual and must not result in a windfall for the beneficiary.


Interest

The price paid for borrowing money. It is expressed as a percentage rate over a period of time and
reflects the rate of exchange of present consumption for future consumption. Also, a share or title in property.


Interest

The cost of money, received on investments or paid on borrowings.


Interest

The cost of funds loaned to an entity. It can also refer to the equity ownership
of an investor in a business entity.


Interest

A charge for the use of money supplied by a lender.


interest

The cost of a loan or the compensation paid for the use of money. For example, you are paid interest for deposits you make into a savings account, and you pay interest for money that you borrow from a low-cost borrowing account.


Interest coverage ratio

The ratio of the Earnings before interest and taxes to the annual interest expense. This
ratio measures a firm's ability to pay interest.


Interest coverage test

A debt limitation that prohibits the issuance of additional long-term debt if the issuer's
interest coverage would, as a result of the issue, fall below some specified minimum.


Interest equalization tax

Tax on foreign investment by residents of the U.S. which was abolished in 1974.


Interest Factor

Numbers found in compound interest and annuity tables. Usually called the FVIF or PVIF.


Interest income

Income that a company receives in the form of interest, usually as the result of keeping money in interest-bearing accounts at financial institutions and the lending of money to other companies.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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