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Transaction demand (for money)

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Definition of Transaction demand (for money)

Transaction Demand (for Money) Image 1

Transaction demand (for money)

The need to accommodate a firm's expected cash transactions.



Related Terms:

Aggregate Demand

Total quantity of goods and services demanded.


Aggregate Demand Curve

Combinations of the price level and income for which the goods and services market is in equilibrium, or for which both the goods and services market and the money market are in equilibrium.


At-the-money

An option is at-the-money if the strike price of the option is equal to the market price of the
underlying security. For example, if xyz stock is trading at 54, then the xyz 54 option is at-the-money.


Call money rate

Also called the broker loan rate , the interest rate that banks charge brokers to finance
margin loans to investors. The broker charges the investor the call money rate plus a service charge.


Cash transaction

A transaction where exchange is immediate, as contrasted to a forward contract, which
calls for future delivery of an asset at an agreed-upon price.



Demand

An amount desired, in the sense that people are willing and able to pay to obtain this amount. Always associated with a given price.


Demand Deposit

A bank deposit that can be withdrawn on demand, such as a deposit in a checking account.


Transaction Demand (for Money) Image 2

Demand deposits

Checking accounts that pay no interest and can be withdrawn upon demand.


Demand line of credit

A bank line of credit that enables a customer to borrow on a daily or on-demand basis.


Demand Loan

A loan which must be repaid in full on demand.


Demand Management Policy

Fiscal or monetary policy designed to influence aggregate demand for goods and services.


Demand master notes

Short-term securities that are repayable immediately upon the holder's demand.


Demand-Pull Inflation

Inflation whose initial cause is excess demand rather than cost increases. See also cost-push inflation.


Demand shock

An event that affects the demand for goods in services in the economy.


Excess Demand

A situation in which demand exceeds supply.


Fiat Money

Fiat money is paper currency made legal tender by law or fiat. It is not backed by gold or silver and is not necessarily redeemable in coin. This practice has had widespread use for about the last 70 years. If governments produce too much of it, there is a loss of confidence. Even so, governments print it routinely when they need it. The value of fiat money is dependent upon the performance of the economy of the country which issued it. Canada's currency falls into this category.


Going-private transactions

Publicly owned stock in a firm is replaced with complete equity ownership by a
private group. The shares are delisted from stock exchanges and can no longer be purchased in the open
markets.


Hedging demands

demands for securities to hedge particular sources of consumption risk, beyond the usual
mean-variance diversification motivation.



High-Powered Money

See money base.


Highly leveraged transaction (HLT)

Bank loan to a highly leveraged firm.


Hot money

money that moves across country borders in response to interest rate differences and that moves
away when the interest rate differential disappears.


In-the-money

A put option that has a strike price higher than the underlying futures price, or a call option
with a strike price lower than the underlying futures price. For example, if the March COMEX silver futures
contract is trading at $6 an ounce, a March call with a strike price of $5.50 would be considered in-the-money
by $0.50 an ounce.
Related: put.


Intercompany transaction

transaction carried out between two units of the same corporation.


Money

Any item that serves as a medium of exchange, a store of value, and a unit of account. See medium of exchange.


Money base

Composed of currency and coins outside the banking system plus liabilities to the deposit money banks.


Money Base

Cash plus deposits of the commercial banks with the central bank.


Money center banks

Banks that raise most of their funds from the domestic and international money markets, relying less on depositors for funds.


Money Laundering

This is the process by which "dirty money" generated by criminal activities is converted through legitimate businesses into assets that cannot be easily traced back to their illegal origins.



Money management

Related: Investment management.


Money manager

Related: Investment manager.


Money market

money markets are for borrowing and lending money for three years or less. The securities in
a money market can be U.S.government bonds, treasury bills and commercial paper from banks and
companies.


Money Market

A market that specializes in trading short-term, low-risk, very liquid
debt securities


money market

Market for short-term financial assets.


Money Market

A financial market in which short-term (maturity of less than a year) debt instruments such as bonds are traded.


Money Market

Financial market in which funds are borrowed or lent for short periods. (The money market is distinguished from the capital market, which is the market for long term funds.)


Money market demand account

An account that pays interest based on short-term interest rates.


Money market fund

A mutual fund that invests only in short term securities, such as bankers' acceptances,
commercial paper, repurchase agreements and government bills. The net asset value per share is maintained at
$1. 00. Such funds are not federally insured, although the portfolio may consist of guaranteed securities
and/or the fund may have private insurance protection.


money market fund

A type of mutual fund that invests primarily in short-term debt securities maturing in one year or less. These include treasury bills, bankers’ acceptances, commercial paper, discount notes and guaranteed investment certficates.


Money market hedge

The use of borrowing and lending transactions in foreign currencies to lock in the
home currency value of a foreign currency transaction.


Money market notes

Publicly traded issues that may be collateralized by mortgages and MBSs.


Money Multiplier

Change in the money supply per change in the money base.


money order

A guaranteed form of payment in amounts up to and including $5,000. You might request a money order in order to pay for tuition fees at a university or a college, or for a magazine subscription.


Money purchase plan

A defined benefit contribution plan in which the participant contributes some part and
the firm contributes at the same or a different rate. Also called and individual account plan.


Money Rate of Interest

See interest rate, nominal.


Money rate of return

Annual money return as a percentage of asset value.


Money supply

M1-A: Currency plus demand deposits
M1-B: M1-A plus other checkable deposits.
M2: M1-B plus overnight repos, money market funds, savings, and small (less than $100M) time deposits.
M3: M-2 plus large time deposits and term repos.
L: M-3 plus other liquid assets.


Neutrality of Money

The doctrine that the money supply affects only the price level, with no long-run impact on real variables.


New money

In a Treasury auction, the amount by which the par value of the securities offered exceeds that of
those maturing.


Out-of-the-money option

A call option is out-of-the-money if the strike price is greater than the market price
of the underlying security. A put option is out-of-the-money if the strike price is less than the market price of
the underlying security.


Picking transaction

Withdrawing parts or subassemblies from stock in order to
manufacture subassemblies or finished products.


Precautionary demand (for money)

The need to meet unexpected or extraordinary contingencies with a
buffer stock of cash.


Printing Money

Sale of bonds by the government to the central bank.


Quantity Theory of Money

Theory that velocity is constant, and so a change in money supply will change nominal income by the same percentage. Formalized by the equation Mv = PQ.


Real Money Supply

money supply expressed in base-year dollars, calculated by dividing the money supply by a price index.


Realizable Revenue A revenue transaction where assets received in exchange for goods and

services are readily convertible into known amounts of cash or claims to cash.


Round-trip transactions costs

Costs of completing a transaction, including commissions, market impact
costs, and taxes.


Speculative demand (for money)

The need for cash to take advantage of investment opportunities that may arise.


Structured arbitrage transaction

A self-funding, self-hedged series of transactions that usually utilize
mortgage securities as the primary assets.


Taxable transaction

Any transaction that is not tax-free to the parties involved, such as a taxable acquisition.


Time value of money

The idea that a dollar today is worth more than a dollar in the future, because the dollar
received today can earn interest up until the time the future dollar is received.


Transaction

The financial description of a business event.


Transaction

A business event that has a monetary impact on an entity’s financial statements,
and is recorded as an entry in its accounting records.


Transaction exposure

Risk to a firm with known future cash flows in a foreign currency that arises from
possible changes in the exchange rate. Related:translation exposure.


Transaction loan

A loan extended by a bank for a specific purpose. In contrast, lines of credit and revolving
credit agreements involve loans that can be used for various purposes.


Transactions costs

The time, effort, and money necessary, including such things as commission fees and the
cost of physically moving the asset from seller to buyer. Related: Round-trip transaction costs, Information
costs, search costs.


Transactions motive

A desire to hold cash for the purpose of conducting cash based transactions.


Variable rated demand bond (VRDB)

Floating rate bond that can be sold back periodically to the issuer.


Warehouse demand

The demand for a part by an outlying warehouse.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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