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Definition of Stockout

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Stockout

Running out of inventory.


Stockout

The absence of any form of inventory when needed.


stockout

the condition of not having inventory available
upon need or request



Related Terms:

ABC inventory classification

A method for dividing inventory into classifications,
either by transaction volume or cost. Typically, category A includes that 20% of
inventory involving 60% of all costs or transactions, while category B includes
the next 20% of inventory involving 20% of all costs or transactions, and category
C includes the remaining 60% of inventory involving 20% of all costs or
transactions.


Advance material request

Very early orders for materials before the completion
of a product design, given the long lead times required to supply some items.


Appropriation request

formal request for funds for capital investment project.



Asymmetric information

Information that is known to some people but not to other people.


Available-for-Sale Security

A debt or equity security not classified as a held-to-maturity security or a trading security. Can be classified as a current or noncurrent investment depending on the intended holding period.


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Average-Cost Inventory Method

The inventory cost-flow assumption that assigns the average
cost of beginning inventory and inventory purchases during a period to cost of goods sold and
ending inventory.


Average inventory

The beginning inventory for a period, plus the amount at the end of
the period, divided by two. It is most commonly used in situations in which just
using the period-end inventory yields highly variable results, due to constant and
large changes in the inventory level.


BARRA's performance analysis (PERFAN)

A method developed by BARRA, a consulting firm in
Berkeley, Calif. It is commonly used by institutional investors applying performance attribution analysis to
evaluate their money managers' performances.


Blanket inventory lien

A secured loan that gives the lender a lien against all the borrower's inventories.


Blue-chip company

Large and creditworthy company.


Book inventory

The amount of money invested in inventory, as per a company’s
accounting records. It is comprised of the beginning inventory balance, plus the
cost of any receipts, less the cost of sold or scrapped inventory. It may be significantly
different from the actual on-hand inventory, if the two are not periodically
reconciled.


Borrower fallout

In the mortgage pipeline, the risk that prospective borrowers of loans committed to be
closed will elect to withdraw from the contract.


Breakout

A rise in a security's price above a resistance level (commonly its previous high price) or drop
below a level of support (commonly the former lowest price.) A breakout is taken to signify a continuing
move in the same direction. Can be used by technical analysts as a buy or sell indicator.


Buyout

Purchase of a controlling interest (or percent of shares) of a company's stock. A leveraged buy-out is
done with borrowed money.


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Cashout

Refers to a situation where a firm runs out of cash and cannot readily sell marketable securities.


Committee, AIMR Performance Presentation Standards Implementation Committee

The Association for Investment Management and Research (AIMR)'s Performance Presentation Standards Implementation
Committee is charged with the responsibility to interpret, revise and update the AIMR Performance
Presentation Standards (AIMR-PPS(TM)) for portfolio performance presentations.



Company Acquisitions

Assets acquired to create money. May include plant, machinery and equipment, shares of another company etc.


company cost of capital

Expected rate of return demanded by investors in a company, determined by the average risk of the company’s assets and operations.


Company-specific risk

Related: Unsystematic risk


Companyspecific Risk

See asset-specific risk


Conditional Buyer

One of two parties to a conditional sale agreement, the other being the conditional seller.


Conditional Sale

A type of agreement to sell whereby a seller retains title to goods sold and delivered to a purchaser until full payment has been made.


Conditional Sale Agreement

An agreement entered into between a conditional buyer and a conditional seller setting out the terms under which goods change hands.


Conditional sales contracts

Similar to equipment trust certificates except that the lender is either the
equipment manufacturer or a bank or finance company to whom the manufacturer has sold the conditional
sales contract.


Conditional Seller

One of two parties to a conditional sale agreement, the other being the conditional buyer.


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Cost company arrangement

Arrangement whereby the shareholders of a project receive output free of
charge but agree to pay all operating and financing charges of the project.



Coupon

The periodic interest payment made to the bondholders during the life of the bond.


Coupon

Detachable certificate attached to a bond that shows the amount of
interest payable at regular intervals, usually semi-annually.Originally
coupons were actually attached to the bonds and had to be cut off or “clipped”
to redeem them and receive the interest payment.


coupon

The interest payments paid to the bondholder.


Coupon

The annual interest payment associated with a bond.


Coupon Bond

any bond with a coupon. Contrast with discount bond.


Coupon / Coupons

The periodic interest payment(s) made by the issuer of a bond
(debt security). Calculated by multiplying the face value of the
security by the coupon rate.


Coupon dates

The dates when the coupons are paid. Typically a bond pays
coupons annually or semi-annually.


Coupon equivalent yield

True interest cost expressed on the basis of a 365-day year.


Coupon payments

A bond's interest payments.


Coupon rate

In bonds, notes or other fixed income securities, the stated percentage rate of interest, usually
paid twice a year.


Coupon Rate

The rate of interest paid on a debt security. Generally stated on an
annual basis, even if the payments are made at some other
interval.


Coupon rate

The nominal interest rate that the issuer promises to pay the
buyer of a bond.


coupon rate

Annual interest payment as a percentage of face value.


Crowding Out

Decreases in aggregate demand which accompany an expansionary fiscal policy, dampening the impact of that policy.


Current coupon

A bond selling at or close to par, that is, a bond with a coupon close to the yields currently
offered on new bonds of a similar maturity and credit risk.


Current-coupon issues

Related: Benchmark issues


Customary payout ratios

A range of payout ratios that is typical based on an analysis of comparable firms.


Days' sales in inventory ratio

The average number of days' worth of sales that is held in inventory.


Days' sales outstanding

Average collection period.


Depository Trust Company (DTC)

DTC is a user-owned securities depository which accepts deposits of
eligible securities for custody, executes book-entry deliveries and records book-entry pledges of securities in
its custody, and provides for withdrawals of securities from its custody.


Direct-Method Format

A format for the operating section of the cash-flow statement that reports actual cash receipts and cash disbursements from operating activities.


Distribution inventory

inventory intended for shipment to customers, usually
comprised of finished goods and service items.


Dividend payout ratio

Percentage of earnings paid out as dividends.


dividend payout ratio

Computed by dividing cash dividends for the year
by the net income for the year. It’s simply the percent of net income distributed
as cash dividends for the year.


dividend payout ratio

Percentage of earnings paid out as dividends.


dollar days (of inventory)

a measurement of the value of inventory for the time that inventory is held


Down-and-out option

Barrier option that expires if asset price hits a barrier.


Dupont system of financial control

Highlights the fact that return on assets (ROA) can be expressed in terms
of the profit margin and asset turnover.


Ending inventory

The dollar value or unit total of goods on hand at the end of an
accounting period.


Expected value of perfect information

The expected value if the future uncertain outcomes could be known
minus the expected value with no additional information.


Fallout risk

A type of mortgage pipeline risk that is generally created when the terms of the loan to be
originated are set at the same time as the sale terms are set. The risk is that either of the two parties, borrower
or investor, fails to close and the loan "falls out" of the pipeline.


Feasible target payout ratios

Payout ratios that are consistent with the availability of excess funds to make
cash dividend payments.


FIFO (First In, First Out)

An inventory valuation method that presumes that the first units received were the first ones
sold.


Finance Company

Company engaged in making loans to individuals or businesses. Unlike a bank, it does not receive deposits from the public.


Finished goods inventory

Goods that have been completed by the manufacturing
process, or purchased in a complete form, but which have not yet been sold to
customers.


Finished goods inventory

Completed inventory items ready for shipment to
customers.


First in, first-out costing method (FIFO)

A process costing methodology that assigns the earliest
cost of production and materials to those units being sold, while the latest costs
of production and materials are assigned to those units still retained in inventory.


First-In-First-Out (FIFO)

A method of valuing the cost of goods sold that uses the cost of the oldest item in
inventory first.


First-in, first-out (FIFO)

A method of accounting for inventory.


First-in, first-out (FIFO)

An inventory valuation method under which one assumes that the
first inventory item to be stored in a bin is the first one to be used, irrespective of
actual usage.


First-In, First-Out (FIFO) Inventory Method

The inventory cost-flow assumption that
assigns the earliest inventory acquisition costs to cost of goods sold. The most recent inventory
acquisition costs are assumed to remain in ending inventory.


Flat benefit formula

Method used to determine a participant's benefits in a defined benefit plan by
multiplying months of service by a flat monthly benefit.


Fluctuation inventory

Excess inventory kept on hand to provide a buffer against
forecasting errors.


Form 1099

A form used by businesses to report to the government payments
made to certain types of suppliers.


Form 4070

A form used by employees to report to an employer the amount of
their tip income.


Form 668-W

The standard form used for notifying a company to garnish an employee’s
wages for unpaid taxes.


Form 8027

The form used by employers to report tip income by their employees
to the government.


Form 940

A form used to report federal unemployment tax remittances and liabilities.


Form 940-EZ

A shortened version of the form 940.
form 941
A form used to identify to the government the amount of all quarterly
wages on which taxes were withheld, the amount of taxes withheld, and any adjustments
to withheld taxes from previous reporting periods.


Form I-9

The Employment Eligibility Verification form, which must be filled
out for all new employees to establish their identity and eligibility to work.


Formalized Line of Credit

A contractual commitment to make loans to a particular borrower up to a specified maximum during a specified period, usually one year.


Formula basis

A method of selling a new issue of common stock in which the SEC declares the registration
statement effective on the basis of a price formula rather than on a specific range.


Freight out

The transportation cost associated with the delivery of goods from a company
to its customers.


Full coupon bond

A bond with a coupon equal to the going market rate, thereby, the bond is selling at par.


Full-Employment Output

The level of output produced by the economy when operating at the natural rate of unemployment.


Full-payout lease

See: financial lease.


Future-Oriented Financial Information

Information about prospective results of operations, financial position and/or changes in financial position, based on assumptions about future economic conditions and courses of action. Future-oriented financial information is presented as either a forecast or a projection.


Hedge inventory

Excess inventories kept on hand as a buffer against contingent
events.


High-coupon bond refunding

Refunding of a high-coupon bond with a new, lower coupon bond.


Holding company

A corporation that owns enough voting stock in another firm to control management and
operations by influencing or electing its board of directors.


Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (IIRIRA)

A federal Act shielding employers from liability if they have made
a good-faith effort to verify a new employee’s identity and employment eligibility.


Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986

A federal Act requiring all employers having at least four employees to verify the identity and employment
eligibility of all regular, temporary, casual, and student employees.


In-transit inventory

inventory currently situated between its shipment and delivery
locations.


Inactive inventory

Parts with no recent prior or forecasted usage.


Indirect-Method Format

A format for the operating section of the cash-flow statement that
presents the derivation of cash flow provided by operating activities. The format starts with net
income and adjusts for all nonoperating items and all noncash expenses and changes in working capital accounts.


information

bits of knowledge or fact that have been carefully
chosen from a body of data and arranged in a meaningful way


Information asymmetry

A situation involving information that is known to some, but not all, participants.


Information Coefficient (IC)

The correlation between predicted and actual stock returns, sometimes used to
measure the value of a financial analyst. An IC of 1.0 indicates a perfect linear relationship between predicted
and actual returns, while an IC of 0.0 indicates no linear relationship.


Information-content effect

The rise in the stock price following the dividend signal.


information content of dividends

Dividend increases send good news about cash flow and earnings. Dividend cuts send bad news.


Information costs

Transaction costs that include the assessment of the investment merits of a financial asset.
Related: search costs.


Information-motivated trades

Trades in which an investor believes he or she possesses pertinent
information not currently reflected in the stock's price.


Information services

Organizations that furnish investment and other types of information, such as
information that helps a firm monitor its cash position.


Informational efficiency

The speed and accuracy with which prices reflect new information.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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