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approximated net realizable value at split-off allocation

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Definition of approximated net realizable value at split-off allocation

Approximated Net Realizable Value At Split-off Allocation Image 1

approximated net realizable value at split-off allocation

a method of allocating joint cost to joint products using a
simulated net realizable value at the split-off point; approximated
value is computed as final sales price minus
incremental separate costs



Related Terms:

Account Value

The sum of all the interest options in your policy, including interest.


Accumulated Value

An amount of money invested plus the interest earned on that money.


Adjusted present value (APV)

The net present value analysis of an asset if financed solely by equity
(present value of un-levered cash flows), plus the present value of any financing decisions (levered cash
flows). In other words, the various tax shields provided by the deductibility of interest and the benefits of
other investment tax credits are calculated separately. This analysis is often used for highly leveraged
transactions such as a leverage buy-out.


allocation

the systematic assignment of an amount to a recipient
set of categories annuity a series of equal cash flows (either positive or negative) per period


Allocation

The process of storing costs in one account and shifting them to other
accounts, based on some relevant measure of activity.



Allocation base A measure of activity or volume such as labour

hours, machine hours or volume of production
used to apportion overheads to products and
services.


Asset allocation decision

The decision regarding how an institution's funds should be distributed among the
major classes of assets in which it may invest.


Approximated Net Realizable Value At Split-off Allocation Image 2

Benefit Value

The amount of cash payable on a benefit.


Bond value

With respect to convertible bonds, the value the security would have if it were not convertible
apart from the conversion option.


Book value

A company's book value is its total assets minus intangible assets and liabilities, such as debt. A
company's book value might be more or less than its market value.


BOOK VALUE

An asset’s cost basis minus accumulated depreciation.


Book Value

The value of an asset as carried on the balance sheet of a
company. In reference to the value of a company, it is the net worth
(equity) of the company.


Book value

An asset’s original cost, less any depreciation that has been subsequently incurred.


book value

net worth of the firm’s assets or liabilities according
to the balance sheet.


book value and book value per share

Generally speaking, these terms
refer to the balance sheet value of an asset (or less often of a liability) or
the balance sheet value of owners’ equity per share. Either term emphasizes
that the amount recorded in the accounts or on the books of a business
is the value being used. The total of the amounts reported for
owners’ equity in its balance sheet is divided by the number of stock
shares of a corporation to determine the book value per share of its capital
stock.


BOOK VALUE OF COMMON STOCK

The theoretical amount per share that each stockholder would receive if a company’s assets were sold on the balance sheet’s date. Book value equals:
(Stockholders’ equity) / (Common stock shares outstanding)


Approximated Net Realizable Value At Split-off Allocation Image 3

Book value per share

The ratio of stockholder equity to the average number of common shares. Book value
per share should not be thought of as an indicator of economic worth, since it reflects accounting valuation
(and not necessarily market valuation).


Book Value per Share

The book value of a company divided by the number of shares
outstanding



business-value-added activity

an activity that is necessary for the operation of the business but for which a customer would not want to pay


Capital allocation

decision allocation of invested funds between risk-free assets versus the risky portfolio.


CAPITAL IN EXCESS OF PAR VALUE

What a company collected when it sold stock for more than the par value per share.


Carrying value

Book value.


Cash-surrender value

An amount the insurance company will pay if the policyholder ends a whole life
insurance policy.


Cash Surrender Value

This is the amount available to the owner of a life insurance policy upon voluntary termination of the policy before it becomes payable by the death of the life insured. This does not apply to term insurance but only to those policies which have reduced paid up values and cash surrender values. A cash surrender in lieu of death benefit usually has tax implications.


Cash Surrender Value

Benefit that entitles a policy owner to an amount of money upon cancellation of a policy.


Cash value added (CVA)

A method of investment appraisal that calculates the ratio of the net present value of an
investment to the initial capital investment.


Conversion value

Also called parity value, the value of a convertible security if it is converted immediately.


cost allocation

the assignment, using some reasonable basis,
of any indirect cost to one or more cost objects



Dynamic asset allocation

An asset allocation strategy in which the asset mix is mechanistically shifted in
response to -changing market conditions, as in a portfolio insurance strategy, for example.


Economic Value Added (EVA)

Operating profit, adjusted to remove distortions caused by certain accounting rules, less a charge
to cover the cost of capital invested in the business.


economic value added (EVA)

a measure of the extent to which income exceeds the dollar cost of capital; calculated
as income minus (invested capital times the cost of capital percentage)


economic value added (EVA)

Term used by the consulting firm Stern Stewart for profit remaining after deduction of the cost
of the capital employed.


European Monetary System (EMS)

An exchange arrangement formed in 1979 that involves the currencies
of European Union member countries.


Exercise value

The amount of advantage over a current market transaction provided by an in-the-money
option.


Exit value

The value that an asset is expected to have at the time it is sold at a predetermined
point in the future.


Expected value

The weighted average of a probability distribution.


Expected Value

The value of the possible outcomes of a variable weighted by the
probabilities of each outcome


Expected value of perfect information

The expected value if the future uncertain outcomes could be known
minus the expected value with no additional information.


Exposure netting

Offsetting exposures in one currency with exposures in the same or another currency,
where exchange rates are expected to move in such a way that losses or gains on the first exposed position
should be offset by gains or losses on the second currency exposure.


Extraordinary positive value

A positive net present value.


Face value

See: Par value.


Face Value

The nominal value of a security. Also called the par value.


Face value

The maturity value of a security. Also known as par value,
principal value, or redemption value.


face value

Payment at the maturity of the bond. Also called par value or maturity value.


Face Value

The payoff value of a bond upon maturity. Also called par value. See principal.


Face Value

The nominal value which appears on the face of a document recording an entitlement, generally an amount of money that has to be repaid on the maturity of a debt instrument.


Fair market value

The price that an asset or service will fetch on the open market.


Fair Market Value

The highest price available, expressed in terms of cash, in an open and unrestricted market between informed, prudent parties acting at arm's length and under no compulsion to transact.


Fair Value

The amount at which an asset could be purchased or sold or a liability incurred or
settled in a current transaction between willing and informed parties. When a quoted market price
is available, fair value is the product of the number of units in question times that market price.
That product also is referred to as the item's market value. For traded securities, the terms fair
value and market value are synonymous. When no quoted market price is available for the item
in question, fair value must be estimated.


Firm's net value of debt

Total firm value minus total firm debt.


Future value

The amount of cash at a specified date in the future that is equivalent in value to a specified
sum today.


Future Value

The amount a given payment, or series of payments, will be worth
at the end of a specified time period, if invested at a given rate


future value

the amount to which one or more sums of
money invested at a specified interest rate will grow over
a specified number of time periods


Future value

The value that a sum of money (the present value) earning
compound interest will have in the future.


future value

Amount to which an investment will grow after earning interest.


Future Value

The amount to which a payment or series of payments will grow by a given future date when compounded by a given interest rate. FVIF future value interest factor.


Income Splitting

This is a tax planning strategy of arranging for income to be transferred to family members who are in lower tax brackets than the one earning the income, thus reducing taxes. Even though attribution rules limit income splitting, there are still a number of legitimate ways to do so, such as through the use of spousal RRSPs.


International Monetary Fund

An organization founded in 1944 to oversee exchange arrangements of
member countries and to lend foreign currency reserves to members with short-term balance of payment
problems.


International Monetary Fund (IMF)

Organization originally established to manage the postwar fixed exchange rate system.


International Monetary Market (IMM)

A division of the CME established in 1972 for trading financial
futures. Related: Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME).


Internet business model

a model that involves
(1) few physical assets,
(2) little management hierarchy, and
(3) a direct pipeline to customers


intranet

a mechanism for sharing information and delivering data from corporate databases to the local-area network (LAN) desktops


Intrinsic value of a firm

The present value of a firm's expected future net cash flows discounted by the
required rate of return.


Intrinsic value of an option

The amount by which an option is in-the-money. An option which is not in-themoney
has no intrinsic value. Related: in-the-money.


Investment value

Related:straight value.


Last split

After a stock split, the number of shares distributed for each share held and the date of the
distribution.


Liquidation value

net amount that could be realized by selling the assets of a firm after paying the debt.


Liquidation Value

The net proceeds (after taxes and expenses) of selling the assets
of a company at fair market prices


liquidation value

net proceeds that would be realized by selling the firm’s assets and paying off its creditors.


Loan value

The amount a policyholder may borrow against a whole life insurance policy at the interest rate
specified in the policy.


Market value

1) The price at which a security is trading and could presumably be purchased or sold.
2) The value investors believe a firm is worth; calculated by multiplying the number of shares outstanding by the
current market price of a firm's shares.


Market value

The price at which a product or service could be sold on the open market.


Market Value

A quoted market price per unit times the number of units being valued. Synonymous
with fair value for financial instruments when a quoted market price is available.


market value added

Market value of equity minus book value.


market-value balance sheet

Financial statement that uses the market value of all assets and liabilities.


Market value ratios

Ratios that relate the market price of the firm's common stock to selected financial
statement items.


Market value-weighted index

An index of a group of securities computed by calculating a weighted average
of the returns on each security in the index, with the weights proportional to outstanding market value.


Maturity value

Related: par value.


Monetarism

School of economic thought stressing the importance of the money supply in the economy. Adherents believe that the economy is inherently stable, so that policy is best undertaken through adoption of a policy rule.


Monetarist Rule

Proposal that the money supply be increased at a steady rate equal approximately to the real rate of growth of the economy. Contrast with discretionary policy.


Monetary Aggregate

Any measure of the economy's money supply.


Monetary Base

See money base.


Monetary gold

Gold held by governmental authorities as a financial asset.


Monetary / non-monetary method

Under this translation method, monetary items (e.g. cash, accounts
payable and receivable, and long-term debt) are translated at the current rate while non-monetary items (e.g.
inventory, fixed assets, and long-term investments) are translated at historical rates.


Monetary policy

Actions taken by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System to influence the
money supply or interest rates.


Monetary Policy

Actions taken by the central bank to change the supply of money and the interest rate and thereby affect economic activity.


Monetizing the Debt

See printing money.


Net adjusted present value

The adjusted present value minus the initial cost of an investment.


Net advantage of refunding

The net present value of the savings from a refunding.


Net advantage to leasing

The net present value of entering into a lease financing arrangement rather than
borrowing the necessary funds and buying the asset.


Net advantage to merging

The difference in total post- and pre-merger market value minus the cost of the merger.


net asset value

The value of all the holdings of a mutual fund, less the fund's liabilities.


Net asset value (NAV)

The value of a fund's investments. For a mutual fund, the net asset value per share
usually represents the fund's market price, subject to a possible sales or redemption charge. For a closed end
fund, the market price may vary significantly from the net asset value.


Net assets

The difference between total assets on the one hand and current liabilities and noncapitalized longterm
liabilities on the other hand.


Net benefit to leverage factor

A linear approximation of a factor, T*, that enables one to operationalize the
total impact of leverage on firm value in the capital market imperfections view of capital structure.


Net book value

The current book value of an asset or liability; that is, its original book value net of any
accounting adjustments such as depreciation.


Net Cash after Operations

Cash flow available for debt service—the payment of interest and principal on loans. Generally calculated as cash provided by operating activities before interest
expense.


Net cash balance

Beginning cash balance plus cash receipts minus cash disbursements.


Net change

This is the difference between a day's last trade and the previous day's last trade.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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