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U.S. Treasury bill

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Definition of U.S. Treasury bill

U.S. Treasury Bill Image 1

U.S. Treasury bill

U.S. government debt with a maturity of less than a year.



Related Terms:

Treasury bill

Short-term U.S. government security issued at a discount from
the face value and paying the face value at maturity.


Treasury Bill

A short-term (less than one year) government discount bond.


Treasury Bill

Short-term government security.


Treasury bills

Debt obligations of the U.S. treasury that have maturities of one year or less. Maturities for Tbills
are usually 91 days, 182 days, or 52 weeks.


Bill and Hold Practices

Products that have been sold with an explicit agreement that delivery
will occur at a later, often yet-to-be-determined, date.
Capitalize To report an expenditure or accrual as an asset as opposed to expensing it and charging it against earnings currently.



Bill of exchange

General term for a document demanding payment.


Bill of lading

A contract between the exporter and a transportation company in which the latter agrees to
transport the goods under specified conditions which limit its liability. It is the exporter's receipt for the goods
as well as proof that goods have been or will be received.


U.S. Treasury Bill Image 2

Bill of materials

A listing of all the materials and quantities that go to make up a completed product.


bill of materials

a document that contains information about
the product materials components and their specifications
(including quality and quantities needed)


Bill of materials

An itemization of the parts and subassemblies required to create a
product, frequently including assumed scrap rates that will arise as part of the production
process.


Bill of materials (BOM)

A listing of all parts and subassemblies required to produce one
unit of a finished product, including the required number of units of each part
and subassembly.


Breeder bill of materials

A bill of material that accounts for the generation and
cost implications of byproducts as a result of manufacturing the parent item.


Cash management bill

Very short maturity bills that the treasury occasionally sells because its cash
balances are down and it needs money for a few days.


Cost Plus Estimated Earnings in Excess of Billings

Revenue recognized to date under the percentage-of-completion method in excess of amounts billed. Also known as unbilled accounts
receivable.


Due bill

An instrument evidencing the obligation of a seller to deliver securities sold to the buyer.
Occasionally used in the bill market.


Indented bill of material

A bill of material reporting format under which successively
lower levels of components are indented farther away from the left
margin.


U.S. Treasury Bill Image 3

Invoice billing

billing system in which the invoices are sent off at the time of customer orders are all separate
bills to be paid.


Matrix bill of material

A bill of materials chart listing the bills for similar products,
which is useful for determining common components.



Modular bill of material

A bill of material format in which components and subassemblies
are clustered by product option, so one can more easily plan for the
assembly of finished goods with different configurations.


Multilevel bill of material

An itemization of all bill of material components, including
a nested categorization of all components used for subassemblies.


online bill payment

The electronic payment of a bill via the Internet. The specified amount of the bill is electronically debited from your account.


Phantom bill of material

A bill of materials for a subassembly that is not normally
kept in stock, because it is used at once as part of a higher-level assembly or
finished product.


Repair bill of material

A special bill itemizing changes needed to refurbish an
existing product.


Single-level bill of material

A list of all components used in a parent item.


Statement billing

billing method in which the sales for a period such as a month (for which a customer also
receives invoices) are collected into a single statement and the customer must pay all of the invoices
represented on the statement.


Summarized bill of materials

A bill of materials format showing the grand total
usage requirement for each component of a finished product.


T-bill

See treasury bill.


Tax anticipation bills (TABs)

Special bills that the treasury occasionally issues that mature on corporate
quarterly income tax dates and can be used at face value by corporations to pay their tax liabilities.



Treasury bond

Long-term debt obligation of the U.S. government that makes
coupon payments semi-annually and is sold at or near par value in $1000
denominations or higher. Face value is paid at maturity.


Treasury bonds

Debt obligations of the U.S. treasury that have maturities of 10 years or more.


Treasury notes

Debt obligations of the U.S. treasury that have maturities of more than 2 years but less than 10 years.


Treasury securities

Securities issued by the U.S. Department of the treasury.


Treasury stock

Common stock that has been repurchased by the company and held in the company's treasury.


Treasury stock

Shares that were sold to the public but have since been repurchased by the company in the open market. treasury stock is deducted from the equity section, and is therefore a contraequity account.


treasury stock

Stock that has been repurchased by the company and held in its treasury.


U.S. Treasury bond

U.S. government debt with a maturity of more than 10 years.


U.S. Treasury note

U.S. government debt with a maturity of one to 10 years.


Unbilled Accounts Receivable

Revenue recognized under the percentage-of-completion
method in excess of amounts billed. Also known as cost plus estimated earnings in excess of
billings.


Bank discount basis

A convention used for quoting bids and offers for treasury bills in terms of annualized
yield , based on a 360-day year.


Cash-equivalent items

Temporary investments of currently excess cash in short-term, high-quality
investment media such as treasury bills and Banker's Acceptances.


Debt Instrument

Any financial asset corresponding to a debt, such as a bond or a treasury bill.


Discount securities

Non-interest-bearing money market instruments that are issued at a discount and
redeemed at maturity for full face value, e.g. U.S. treasury bills.


market risk premium

Risk premium of market portfolio. Difference between market return and return on risk-free treasury bills.


Marketable security

An easily traded investment, such as treasury bills, which is
recorded as a current asset, since it is easily convertible into cash.


Money market

Money markets are for borrowing and lending money for three years or less. The securities in
a money market can be U.S.government bonds, treasury bills and commercial paper from banks and
companies.


money market fund

A type of mutual fund that invests primarily in short-term debt securities maturing in one year or less. These include treasury bills, bankers’ acceptances, commercial paper, discount notes and guaranteed investment certficates.


qualified investments (Canada)

Qualified investments is the term used for investments that can be held in an RSP. These investments generally include:
Canadian dollar savings accounts, guaranteed investment certificates, term deposits
shares of Canadian and foreign companies listed on a prescribed stock exchange
shares of some over-the-counter U.S. and Canadian companies
shares of some small businesses
certain types of bonds and money-market investments such as treasury bills, Canada Savings Bonds, Government of Canada bonds, provincial government bonds, Crown Corporation bonds, bonds issued by Canadian corporations listed on a prescribed stock exchange, and certain strip bonds
certain types of mortgages, including your own
certain covered call options, warrants and rights
certain mutual funds


Risk-Free Rate

The rate of return obtainable on government of Canada treasury bills.


Riskless rate

The rate earned on a riskless investment, typically the rate earned on the 90-day U.S. treasury bill.


Stock replacement strategy

A strategy for enhancing a portfolio's return, employed when the futures
contract is expensive based on its theoretical price, involving a swap between the futures, treasury bills
portfolio and a stock portfolio.


TED spread

Difference between U.S. treasury bill rate and eurodollar rate; used by some traders as a
measure of investor/trader anxiety.


Wi wi

treasury bills trade on a wi basis between the day they are auctioned and the day settlement is made.
bills traded before they are auctioned are said to be traded wi wi.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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