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Definition of Timecard

Timecard Image 1

Timecard

A document or electronic record on which an employee records his or
her hours worked during a payroll period.



Related Terms:

Accounting period

The period of time for which financial statements are produced – see also financial year.


Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income

Cumulative gains or losses reported in shareholders'
equity that arise from changes in the fair value of available-for-sale securities, from the
effects of changes in foreign-currency exchange rates on consolidated foreign-currency financial
statements, certain gains and losses on financial derivatives, and from adjustments for underfunded
pension plans.


Annualized holding period return

The annual rate of return that when compounded t times, would have
given the same t-period holding return as actually occurred from period 1 to period t.


Annuity Period

The time between each payment under an annuity.


Average Amortization Period

The average useful life of a company's collective amortizable asset base.



Average Collection Period

Average number of days necessary to receive cash for the sale of
a company's products. It is calculated by dividing the value of the
accounts receivable by the average daily sales for the period.


Average collection period, or days' receivables

The ratio of accounts receivables to sales, or the total
amount of credit extended per dollar of daily sales (average AR/sales * 365).


Timecard Image 1

Bellwether

A signalling device.


Bellwether issues

Related:Benchmark issues.


Cherry Picking

Selecting specific assets for sale so as to record desired gains or losses.


Common stock/other equity

Value of outstanding common shares at par, plus accumulated retained
earnings. Also called shareholders' equity.


Compounding period

The length of the time period (for example, a quarter in the case of quarterly
compounding) that elapses before interest compounds.


compounding period

the time between each interest computation


Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act

A federal Act requiring federal contractors to pay overtime for hours worked exceeding 40 per week.


Credit period

The length of time for which the customer is granted credit.


Critical Growth Periods

Times in a company's history when growth is essential and without which survival of the business might be in jeopardy.


Timecard Image 2

Date of record

Date on which holders of record in a firm's stock ledger are designated as the recipients of
either dividends or stock rights.


Discount period

The period during which a customer can deduct the discount from the net amount of the bill
when making payment.



Discounted payback period rule

An investment decision rule in which the cash flows are discounted at an
interest rate and the payback rule is applied on these discounted cash flows.


Documented discount notes

Commercial paper backed by normal bank lines plus a letter of credit from a
bank stating that it will pay off the paper at maturity if the borrower does not. Such paper is also referred to as
LOC (letter of credit) paper.


e-commerce (electronic commerce)

any business activity that uses the Internet and World Wide Web to engage in financial transactions


economically reworked

when the incremental revenue from the sale of reworked defective units is greater than
the incremental cost of the rework


EFT (electronic funds transfer)

Funds which are electronically credited to your account (e.g. direct deposit), or electronically debited from your account on an ongoing basis (e.g. a pre-authorized monthly bill payment, or a monthly loan or mortgage payment). A wire transfer is a form of EFT.


Either/or facility

An agreement permitting a bank customer to borrow either domestic dollars from the
bank's head office or Eurodollars from one of its foreign branches.


Either-way market

In the interbank Eurodollar deposit market, an either-way market is one in which the bid
and offered rates are identical.


Electronic data interchange (EDI)

The exchange of information electronically, directly from one firm's
computer to another firm's computer, in a structured format.


electronic data interchange (EDI)

the computer-to-computer transfer of information in virtual real time using standardized formats developed by the American National Standards Institute


Electronic depository transfers

The transfer of funds between bank accounts through the Automated
Clearing House (ACH) system.



Electronic Federal Tax Payment Systems (EFTPS)

An electronic funds transfer system used by businesses to remit taxes to the government.


Employee

A person who renders services to another entity in exchange for compensation.


Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA)

A federal Act that sets minimum operational and funding standards for employee benefit
plans.


Employee stock fund

A firm-sponsored program that enables employees to purchase shares of the firm's
common stock on a preferential basis.


Employee stock ownership plan (ESOP)

A company contributes to a trust fund that buys stock on behalf of
employees.


Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP)

a profit-sharing compensation program in which investments are made in
the securities of the employer


Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP)

A fund containing company stock and owned by employees, paid for by ongoing contributions by the employer.


employee time sheet

a source document that indicates, for each employee, what jobs were worked on during the day and for what amount of time


Evaluation period

The time interval over which a money manager's performance is evaluated.


Extended Amortization Period

An amortization period that continues beyond a long-lived asset's economic useful life.


Extended Amortization Periods

Amortizing capitalized expenditures over estimated useful lives that are unduly optimistic.


Fisher effect

A theory that nominal interest rates in two or more countries should be equal to the required real
rate of return to investors plus compensation for the expected amount of inflation in each country.


Fisher rate

the rate of return that equates the present values
of the cash flows of all projects being considered; it is the
rate of indifference


Fisher's separation theorem

The firm's choice of investments is separate from its owner's attitudes towards
investments. Also refered to as portfolio separation theorem.


Full Credit Period

The period of trade credit given by a supplier to its customer.


Grace Period

A specific period of time after a premium payment is due during which the policy owner may make a payment, and during which, the protection of the policy continues. The grace period usually ends in 30 days.


Grace Period

Length of time during which repayments of loan principal are excused. Usually occurs at the start of the loan period.


Herstatt risk

The risk of loss in foreign exchange trading that one party will deliver foreign exchange but the counterparty financial institution will fail to deliver its end of the contract. It is also referred to as settlement risk.


historical cost

a cost incurred in the past; the recorded purchase
price of an asset; a sunk cost


Historical cost

The original cost required to perform a service or purchase an asset.


Historical exchange rate

An accounting term that refers to the exchange rate in effect when an asset or
liability was acquired.


Holder-of-record date

The date on which holders of record in a firm's stock ledger are designated as the
recipients of either dividends or stock rights. Also called date of record.


Holding period

Length of time that an individual holds a security.


Holding period return

The rate of return over a given period.


International Fisher effect

States that the interest rate differential between two countries should be an
unbiased predictor of the future change in the spot rate.


international Fisher effect

Theory that real interest rates in all countries should be equal, with differences in nominal rates reflecting differences in expected inflation.


job cost record

see job order cost sheet


line employee

an employee who is directly responsible for
achieving the organization’s goals and objectives


Multiperiod immunization

A portfolio strategy in which a portfolio is created that will be capable of
satisfying more than one predetermined future liability regardless if interest rates change.


Net period

The period of time between the end of the discount period and the date payment is due.


Neutral period

In the Euromarket, a period over which Eurodollars are sold is said to be neutral if it does not
start or end on either a Friday or the day before a holiday.


Odd first or last period

Fixed-income securities may be purchased on dates
that do not coincide with coupon or payment dates. The length of the first and
last periods may differ from the regular period between coupons, and thus the
bond owner is not entitled to the full value of the coupon for that period.
Instead, the coupon is pro-rated according to how long the bond is held during
that period.


operations flow document

a document listing all operations
necessary to produce one unit of product (or perform
a specific service) and the corresponding time allowed
for each operation


Other assets

A cluster of accounts that are listed after fixed assets on the balance sheet,
and which contain minor assets that cannot be reasonably fit into any of the other
main asset categories.


Other capital

In the balance of payments, other capital is a residual category that groups all the capital
transactions that have not been included in direct investment, portfolio investment, and reserves categories. It
is divided into long-term capital and short-term capital and, because of its residual status, can differ from
country to country. Generally speaking, other long-term capital includes most non-negotiable instruments of a
year or more like bank loans and mortgages. Other short-term capital includes financial assets of less than a
year such as currency, deposits, and bills.


Other current assets

Value of non-cash assets, including prepaid expenses and accounts receivable, due
within 1 year.


Other long term liabilities

Value of leases, future employee benefits, deferred taxes and other obligations
not requiring interest payments that must be paid over a period of more than 1 year.


Other sources

Amount of funds generated during the period from operations by sources other than
depreciation or deferred taxes. Part of Free cash flow calculation.


Other-than-Temporary Decline in Market Value

The standard used to describe a decline in market value that is not expected to recover. The use of the other-than-temporary description as
opposed to describing a loss as permanent stresses the fact that the burden of proof is on the
investor who believes a decline is only temporary. That investor must have the intent and financial
ability to hold the investment until its market value recovers. In the absence of an ability to
demonstrate that a decline is temporary, the conclusion must be that a decline in value is other
than temporary, in which case the decline in value must be recognized in income.


Payback Period

The number of years necessary for the net cash flows of an
investment to equal the initial cash outlay


payback period

the time it takes an investor to recoup an
original investment through cash flows from a project


payback period

Time until cash flows recover the initial investment of the project.


Payroll Cycle

The period of service for which a company compensates its employees.


Payroll expense

The amount paid to employees for services rendered; synonymous with salary expense and wage expense.


Payroll journal

A journal used to record the payroll of a company.


Payroll Register

A report on which is summarized the wage and deduction information
for employees for a specific payroll.


Payroll Stabilization

This calculation is used by states to determine the unemployment
contribution rate to charge employers and links the contribution rate
to fluctuations in a company’s total payroll over time.


Payroll tax expense

The amount of tax associated with salaries that an employer pays to governments (federal, state, and local).


Payroll taxes payable

The amount of payroll taxes owed to the various governments at the end of a period.


period cost

cost other than one associated with making or acquiring inventory


Period costs

The costs that relate to a period of time.


periodic compensation

a pay plan based on the time spent on the task rather than the work accomplished


Periodic inventory

A physical inventory count taken on a repetitive basis.


Periodic inventory system

An inventory system in which the balance in the Inventory account is adjusted for the units sold only at the end of the period.


PPF (periodic perpetuity factor)

a generalization formula invented by Abrams that is the present value of regular but noncontiguous cash flows that have constant growth to perpetuity.


Preauthorized electronic debits (PADs)

Debits to its bank account in advance by the payer. The payer's
bank sends payment to the payee's bank through the _ACH)Automated Clearing House (ACH) system.


Realizable Revenue A revenue transaction where assets received in exchange for goods and

services are readily convertible into known amounts of cash or claims to cash.


Record accuracy

The variance between book and on-hand quantities, expressed
as a percentage.


Record date

1) Date by which a shareholder must officially own shares in order to be entitled to a dividend.
For example, a firm might declare a dividend on Nov 1, payable Dec 1 to holders of record Nov 15. Once a
trade is executed an investor becomes the "owner of record" on settlement, which currently takes 5 business
days for securities, and one business day for mutual funds. Stocks trade ex-dividend the fourth day before the
record date, since the seller will still be the owner of record and is thus entitled to the dividend.
2) The date that determines who is entitled to payment of principal and interest due to be paid on a security. The record
date for most MBSs is the last day of the month, however the last day on which they may be presented for the
transfer is the last business day of the month. The record date for CMOs and asset-backed securities vary with each issue.


Record date

The date used to decide which shareholders will receive the dividend. The owners of the shares at the end of this day are entitled to the dividend.


Red herring

A preliminary prospectus containing information required by the SEC. It excludes the offering
price and the coupon of the new issue.


Reporting period

The time period for which transactions are compiled into a set of financial statements.


routing document

see operations flow document


Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees (SIMPLE)

An IRA set up by an employer with no other retirement plan and employing fewer than 100 employees,
into which they can contribute up to $9,000 per year (as of 2004).


Source document

The document that records a transaction and forms the basis for recording in a business’s
accounting system.


staff employee

an employee responsible for providing advice,
guidance, and service to line personnel


Subperiod return

The return of a portfolio over a shorter period of time than the evaluation period.


T-period holding-period return

The percentage return over the T-year period an investment lasts.


Waiting period

Time during which the SEC studies a firm's registration statement. during this time the firm
may distribute a preliminary prospectus.


Waiting Period (Credit Insurance)

A specific time that must pass following the onset of a covered disability before any benefits will be paid under a creditor disability policy. (Also known as an elimination period).


Where-used report

A report listing every product whose bill of material calls for
the use of a specific component.


Workout period

Realignment period of a temporary misaligned yield relationship that sometimes occurs in
fixed income markets.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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