Financial Terms
Tender offer premium

Main Page

Alphabetical
Index

SEARCH


Information about financial, finance, business, accounting, payroll, inventory, investment, money, inventory control, stock trading, financial advisor, tax advisor, credit.

 


Main Page: accounting, tax advisor, inventory control, financial, inventory, finance, credit, investment,

Definition of Tender offer premium

Tender Offer Premium Image 1

Tender offer premium

The premium offered above the current market price in a tender offer.



Related Terms:

Annual Premium

Yearly amount payable by a client for a policy or component.


Automatic Waiver of Premium

A benefit that automatically forfeits premium payments.


Cash offer

A public equity issue that is sold to all interested investors.


Competitive offering

An offering of securities through competitive bidding.


control premium

the additional value inherent in the control interest as contrasted to a minority interest, which reflects its power of control



Conversion premium

The percentage by which the conversion price in a convertible security exceeds the
prevailing common stock price at the time the convertible security is issued.


Default premium

A differential in promised yield that compensates the investor for the risk inherent in
purchasing a corporate bond that entails some risk of default.


Tender Offer Premium Image 2

default premium

Difference in promised yields between a default-free bond and a riskier bond.


Dual syndicate equity offering

An international equity placement where the offering is split into two
tranches - domestic and foreign - and each tranche is handled by a separate lead manager.


Exchange offer

An offer by the firm to give one security, such as a bond or preferred stock, in exchange for
another security, such as shares of common stock.


Exclusionary self-tender

The firm makes a tender offer for a given amount of its own stock while excluding
targeted stockholders.


Fixed-price tender offer

A one-time offer to purchase a stated number of shares at a stated fixed price,
usually a premium to the current market price.


Forward premium

A currency trades at a forward premium when its forward price is higher than its spot price.


General cash offer

A public offering made to investors at large.


general cash offer

Sale of securities open to all investors by an already-public company.


Initial Public Offering

A firms first offering of its shares to the investment public, after registration requirements of the various securities regulators have been met.


Tender Offer Premium Image 3

Initial public offering (IPO)

A company's first sale of stock to the public. Securities offered in an IPO are
often, but not always, those of young, small companies seeking outside equity capital and a public market for
their stock. Investors purchasing stock in IPOs generally must be prepared to accept very large risks for the
possibility of large gains. IPO's by investment companies (closed-end funds) usually contain underwriting
fees which represent a load to buyers.


initial public offering (IPO)

First offering of stock to the general public.



Level Premium

A premium that remains unchanged throughout the life of a policy


Level Premium Life Insurance

This is a type of insurance for which the cost is distributed evenly over the premium payment period. The premium remains the same from year to year and is more than actual cost of protection in the earlier years of the policy and less than the actual cost of protection in the later years. The excess paid in the early years builds up a reserve to cover the higher cost in the later years.


Liquidity premium

Forward rate minus expected future short-term interest rate.


market risk premium

Risk premium of market portfolio. Difference between market return and return on risk-free Treasury bills.


maturity premium

Extra average return from investing in longversus short-term Treasury securities.


Negotiated offering

An offering of securities for which the terms, including underwriters' compensation,
have been negotiated between the issuer and the underwriters.


Offer

Indicates a willingness to sell at a given price. Related: bid
offer price See: offer.


Offering memorandum

A document that outlines the terms of securities to be offered in a private placement.


Offering Memorandum

A "prosperous-like" document providing detailed descriptions of a company's past, present, and prospective business operations. It is normally prepared for the use of potential purchasers of securities offered under the seed capital or private placement prospectus exemptions.


Tender Offer Premium Image 4

Option premium

The option price.



PIBOR (Paris Interbank Offer Rate)

The deposit rate on interbank transactions in the Eurocurrency market
quoted in Paris.


Premium

1) Amount paid for a bond above the par value.
2) The price of an option contract; also, in futures
trading, the amount the futures price exceeds the price of the spot commodity. Related: inverted market premium payback period. Also called break-even time, the time it takes to recover the premium per share of a
convertible security.


Premium

This is your payment for the cost of insurance. You may pay annually, semi-annually, quarterly or monthly. The least expensive method is annually. Using any of the other payment modes will cost you more money. For example, paying monthly will cost about 17% more. If you pay annually and terminate your coverage part way through the year, you may not receive a refund for the remaining months to the annual renewal date.
The cost of life insurance varies by age, sex, health, lifestyle, avocation and occupation. Generally speaking, the following is true at the time of applying for coverage; the older you are, the more will be the cost; of a male and female of the same age, the female will be considered 4 years younger; health problems will increase the cost of insurance and may result in rejection altogether; dangerous hobbies such as SCUBA diving, private flying, bungi jumping, parachuting, etc. may increase the cost of insurance and may result in rejection altogether; abuse of alcohol or drugs or a poor driving record will make getting coverage difficult.


Premium

Annual amount payable, by a client, for selected product or service.


Premium bond

A bond that is selling for more than its par value.


Premium (Credit Insurance)

Annual or monthly amounts payable, by a client, for a selected insurance coverage to insure debt obligations to their creditors are protected.


Premium Grant

A nonqualified stock option whose option price is set substantially
higher than the current fair market value at the grant date.


Premium Mode

Payment schedule of policy premiums, usually selected by the policy owner (monthly, quarterly, annually).


Premium Offset

After premiums have been paid for a number of years, further annual premiums may be paid by the current dividends and the surrender of some of the paid-up additions which have built up in the policy. In effect, the policy can begin to pay for itself. Whether a policy becomes eligible for premium offset, the date on which it becomes eligible and whether it remains eligible once premium offset begins, will all depend on how the dividend scale changes over the years. Since dividends are not guaranteed, premium offset cannot be guaranteed either.


Primary offering

A firm selling some of its own newly issued shares to investors.


Public offering

The sale of registered securities by the issuer (or the underwriters acting in the interests of the
issuer) in the public market. Also called public issue.


Public offering

The sale of new securities to the investing public.


Reoffering yield

In a purchase and sale, the yield to maturity at which the underwriter offers to sell the bonds
to investors.


Rights offering

Issuance of "rights" to current shareholders allowing them to purchase additional shares,
usually at a discount to market price. Shareholders who do not exercise these rights are usually diluted by the
offering. Rights are often transferable, allowing the holder to sell them on the open market to others who may
wish to exercise them. Rights offerings are particularly common to closed end funds, which cannot otherwise
issue additional common stock.


Risk premium

The reward for holding the risky market portfolio rather than the risk-free asset. The spread
between Treasury and non-Treasury bonds of comparable maturity.


Risk Premium

The additional rate of return required on a risky project
(investment) when compared to a risk-free project (investment)


risk premium

Expected return in excess of risk-free return as compensation for risk.


Risk Premium

The difference between the yields of two bonds because of differences in their risk.


Risk Premium

The difference between the required rate of return on a riskless asset with the same expected life.


Risk premium approach

The most common approach for tactical asset allocation to determine the relative
valuation of asset classes based on expected returns.


seasoned offering

Sale of securities by a firm that is already publicly traded.


Single-premium deferred annuity

An insurance policy bought by the sponsor of a pension plan for a single
premium. In return, the insurance company agrees to make lifelong payments to the employee (the
policyholder) when that employee retires.


Tender

To offer for delivery against futures.


Tender offer

General offer made publicly and directly to a firm's shareholders to buy their stock at a price
well above the current market price.


tender offer

Takeover attempt in which outsiders directly offer to buy the stock of the firm’s shareholders.


Term premiums

Excess of the yields to maturity on long-term bonds over those of short-term bonds.


Time premium

Also called time value, the amount by which the option price exceeds its intrinsic value. The
value of an option beyond its current exercise value representing the optionholder's control until expiration,
the risk of the underlying asset, and the riskless return.


Unearned Premium

premiums paid for coverage not yet provided.


Vanishing Premium

This term relates to participating whole life insurance and the use of the dividend to reduce or completely eliminate the need for future premiums. In the 1980's life insurance company's profits from investment were exceedingly high compared to historical experience. It became common for a salesperson to show new prospective clients how quickly his or her insurance company's dividends would cover the future cost of future premiums. In some cases more emphasis was put on the value of future dividends than on the fact that future dividends were not guaranteed and could only be projected based on current earnings. Many life insurance buyers have since learned that the dividends they expected in the 80's no longer exist in the 90's and they are continuing to dig into their pockets to pay insurance premiums.


Waiver of Premium

This is an option available to the applicant for life insurance which sets certain conditions under which an insurance policy will be kept in full force by the insurance company without the payment of premiums. Very specifically, a life insured would have to become totally disabled through injury or illness for a period of six months before the benefit kicks in. When it does, the insurance company retroactively pays premiums from the beginning of the disability until the time the insured is able to perform some form of regular activity. 'Totally disabled' is highlited here, because that is what is required to receive this benefit.


Waiver of Premium

A benefit that allows CLA to pay premiums on behalf of the insured.



 

 

 

 

 

 

Related to : financial, finance, business, accounting, payroll, inventory, investment, money, inventory control, stock trading, financial advisor, tax advisor, credit.


Copyright© 2019 www.finance-lib.com