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Open (good-til-cancelled) order

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Definition of Open (good-til-cancelled) order

Open (good-til-cancelled) Order Image 1

Open (good-til-cancelled) order

An individual investor can place an order to buy or sell a security. That
open order stays active until it is completed or the investor cancels it.



Related Terms:

Average Propensity to Consume

Ratio of consumption to disposable income. See also marginal propensity to consume.


Average Propensity to Save

Ratio of saving to disposable income. See also marginal propensity to save.


Buy limit order

A conditional trading order that indicates a security may be purchased only at the designated
price or lower.
Related: Sell limit order.


Buy on opening

To buy at the beginning of a trading session at a price within the opening range.


Capacity utilization

The proportion of capacity that is able to be utilized to fulfil customer demand for products
or services.



Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME)

A not-for-profit corporation owned by its members. Its primary
functions are to provide a location for trading futures and options, collect and disseminate market information,
maintain a clearing mechanism and enforce trading rules.


cost of goods manufactured (CGM)

the total cost of the
goods completed and transferred to Finished goods Inventory
during the period


Open (good-til-cancelled) Order Image 2

Cost of goods sold

The cost of merchandise that a company sold this year. For manufacturing companies, the cost of raw
materials, components, labor and other things that went into producing an item.


Cost of goods sold

See cost of sales.


Cost of goods sold

The cost of the items that were sold during the current period.


Cost of goods sold

The accumulated total of all costs used to create a product or service,
which is then sold. These costs fall into the general sub-categories of direct
labor, materials, and overhead.


Cost of goods sold

The charge to expense of the direct materials, direct labor, and
allocated overhead costs associated with products sold during a defined accounting
period.


Cross-border risk

Refers to the volatility of returns on international investments caused by events associated
with a particular country as opposed to events associated solely with a particular economic or financial agent.


Day order

An order to buy or sell stock that automatically expires if it can't be executed on the day it is entered.


Discrete order picking

A picking method requiring the sequential completion of
each order before one begins picking the next order.


economic order quantity

order size that minimizes total inventory costs.


Open (good-til-cancelled) Order Image 3

Economic order quantity (EOQ)

The order quantity that minimizes total inventory costs.


economic order quantity (EOQ)

an estimate of the number
of units per order that will be the least costly and provide
the optimal balance between the costs of ordering
and the costs of carrying inventory



engineering change order (ECO)

a business mandate that changes the way in which a product is manufactured or a
service is performed by modifying the design, parts,
process, or even quality of the product or service


Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC)

Fed committee that makes decisions about open-market operations.


Fill or kill order

A trading order that is canceled unless executed within a designated time period.
Related: open order.


Finished goods inventory

goods that have been completed by the manufacturing
process, or purchased in a complete form, but which have not yet been sold to
customers.


Finished goods inventory

Completed inventory items ready for shipment to
customers.


Good delivery

A delivery in which everything - endorsement, any necessary attached legal papers, etc. - is in
order.


Good delivery and settlement procedures

Refers to PSA Uniform Practices such as cutoff times on delivery
of securities and notification, allocation, and proper endorsement.


Good 'til canceled

Sometimes simply called "GTC", it means an order to buy or sell stock that is good until
you cancel it. Brokerages usually set a limit of 30-60 days, at which the GTC expires if not restated.


Goodhart's Law

Whatever measure of the money supply is chosen for application of the monetarist rule will soon begin to misbehave.


Goodwill

Excess of the purchase price over the fair market value of the net assets acquired under purchase
accounting.



Goodwill

The excess of the price paid to buy another company over the book value of
its assets and the increase in cost of its fixed assets to fair market value.


Goodwill

Intangible assets of a firm established by the excess of the price paid for the going concern over the value of its assets.


Implied volatility

The expected volatility in a stock's return derived from its option price, maturity date,
exercise price, and riskless rate of return, using an option-pricing model such as Black/Scholes.


Implied volatility

For an option, the variance that makes a call option price
equal to the market price. Given the option price, strike price, and other
factors, the Black-Scholes model computes implied volatility.


Intermediate Good

A good used in producing another good.


job order cost sheet

a source document that provides virtually
all the financial information about a particular job;
the set of all job order cost sheets for uncompleted jobs
composes the Work in Process Inventory subsidiary ledger


job order costing system

a system of product costing used
by an entity that provides limited quantities of products or
services unique to a customer’s needs; focus of recordkeeping
is on individual jobs


Limit order

An order to buy a stock at or below a specified price or to sell a stock at or above a specified
price. For instance, you could tell a broker "Buy me 100 shares of XYZ Corp at $8 or less" or to "sell 100
shares of XYZ at $10 or better." The customer specifies a price and the order can be executed only if the
market reaches or betters that price. A conditional trading order designed to avoid the danger of adverse
unexpected price changes.


Limit order book

A record of unexecuted limit orders that is maintained by the specialist. These orders are
treated equally with other orders in terms of priority of execution.


Make-to-order

A production scheduling system under which products are only
manufactured once a customer order has been received.


Marginal Propensity to Consume

Fraction of an increase in disposable income that is spent on consumption.


Marginal Propensity to Import

Fraction of an increase in disposable income that is spent on imports.


Marginal Propensity to Save

Fraction of an increase in disposable income that is saved.


Market order

This is an order to immediately buy or sell a security at the current trading price.


money order

A guaranteed form of payment in amounts up to and including $5,000. You might request a money order in order to pay for tuition fees at a university or a college, or for a magazine subscription.


Multilevel bill of material

An itemization of all bill of material components, including
a nested categorization of all components used for subassemblies.


Negative goodwill

A term used to describe a situation in which a business combination
results in the fair market value of all assets purchased being more than the purchase
price.


Negotiable order of withdrawal (NOW)

Demand deposits that pay interest.


Open account

Arrangement whereby sales are made with no formal debt contract. The buyer signs a receipt,
and the seller records the sale in the sales ledger.


open account

Agreement whereby sales are made with no formal debt contract.


Open book

See: unmatched book.


open-book management

a philosophy about increasing a firm’s performance by involving all workers and by ensuring
that all workers have access to operational and financial
information necessary to achieve performance improvements


Open contracts

Contracts which have been bought or sold without the transaction having been completed by
subsequent sale or purchase, or by making or taking actual delivery of the financial instrument or physical
commodity.


Open Economy

An economy which engages in a significant amount of trade. Contrast with closed economy.


Open-end fund

Also called a mutual fund, an investment company that stands ready to sell new shares to the
public and to redeem its outstanding shares on demand at a price equal to an appropriate share of the value of
its portfolio, which is computed daily at the close of the market.


Open-end mortgage

Mortgage against which additional debts may be issued. Related: closed-end mortgage.


Open interest

The total number of derivative contracts traded that not yet been liquidated either by an
offsetting derivative transaction or by delivery. Related: liquidation


Open-market operation

Purchase or sale of government securities by the monetary authorities to increase or
decrease the domestic money supply.


Open-Market Operations

Buying or selling of bonds by the central bank.


Open-market purchase operation

A systematic program of repurchasing shares of stock in market
transactions at current market prices, in competition with other prospective investors.


Open-outcry

The method of trading used at futures exchanges, typically involving calling out the specific
details of a buy or sell order, so that the information is available to all traders.


Open position

A net long or short position whose value will change with a change in prices.


open purchase ordering

a process by which a single purchase
order that expires at a set or determinable future
date is prepared to authorize a supplier to provide a large
quantity of one or more specified items on an as-requested
basis by the customer


Open repo

A repo with no definite term. The agreement is made on a day-to-day basis and either the
borrower or the lender may choose to terminate. The rate paid is higher than on overnight repo and is subject
to adjustment if rates move.


Opening price

The range of prices at which the first bids and offers were made or first transactions were
completed.


Opening purchase

A transaction in which the purchaser's intention is to create or increase a long position in
a given series of options.


Opening sale

A transaction in which the seller's intention is to create or increase a short position in a given
series of options.


Opening, the

The period at the beginning of the trading session officially designated by the exchange during
which all transactions are considered made "at the opening". Related: Close, the


Order penetration point

The point in the production process when a product is
reserved for a specific customer.


Order picking

The process of moving items from stock for shipment to customers.


order point

the level of inventory that triggers the placement
of an order for additional units; it is determined based
on usage, lead time, and safety stock


ordering cost

the variable cost associated with preparing,
receiving, and paying for an order


pecking order theory

Firms prefer to issue debt rather than equity if internal finance is insufficient.


Pecking-order view (of capital structure)

The argument that external financing transaction costs, especially
those associated with the problem of adverse selection, create a dynamic environment in which firms have a
preference, or pecking-order of preferred sources of financing, when all else is equal. Internally generated
funds are the most preferred, new debt is next, debt-equity hybrids are next, and new equity is the least
preferred source.


Preopening Costs

A form of start-up cost incurred in preparing for the opening of a new store or facility.


Realizable Revenue A revenue transaction where assets received in exchange for goods and

services are readily convertible into known amounts of cash or claims to cash.


Reopen an issue

The Treasury, when it wants to sell additional securities, will occasionally sell more of an
existing issue (reopen it) rather than offer a new issue.


Reward-to-volatility ratio

Ratio of excess return to portfolio standard deviation.


Sell limit order

Conditional trading order that indicates that a, security may be sold at the designated price or
higher. Related: buy limit order.


special order decision

a situation in which management must determine a sales price to charge for manufacturing or service jobs outside the company’s normal production/service market


Standstill agreements

Contracts where the bidding firm in a takeover attempt agrees to limit its holdings
another firm.


Stop-limit order

A stop order that designates a price limit. In contrast to the stop order, which becomes a
market order once the stop is reached, the stop-limit order becomes a limit order once the stop is reached.


Stop-loss order

An order to sell a stock when the price falls to a specified level.


Stop order (or stop)

An order to buy or sell at the market when a definite price is reached, either above (on a
buy) or below (on a sell) the price that prevailed when the order was given.


substitute good

an item that can replace another item to satisfy the same wants or needs


Tilted portfolio

An indexing strategy that is linked to active management through the emphasis of a
particular industry sector, selected performance factors such as earnings momentum, dividend yield, priceearnings
ratio, or selected economic factors such as interest rates and inflation.


Time until expiration

The time remaining until a financial contract expires. Also called time to maturity.


Utility

The measure of the welfare or satisfaction of an investor or person.


Utility function

A mathematical expression that assigns a value to all possible choices. In portfolio theory the
utility function expresses the preferences of economic entities with respect to perceived risk and expected return.


Utility value

The welfare a given investor assigns to an investment with a particular return and risk.


Volatility

A measure of risk based on the standard deviation of investment fund performance over 3 years.
Scale is 1-9; higher rating indicates higher risk. Also, the standard deviation of changes in the logarithm of an
asset price, expressed as a yearly rate. Also, volatility is a variable that appears in option pricing formulas. In
the option pricing formula, it denotes the volatility of the underlying asset return from now to the expiration
of the option.
Std Deviation = Rating
up to 7.99 = 1
8.00-10.99 = 2
11.00-13.99 = 3
14.00-16.99 = 4
17.00-19.99 = 5
20.00-22.99 = 6
23.00-25.99 = 7
26.00-28.99 = 8
29.00 and up = 9


Volatility

The probability of change


Volatility

a. Another general term for sensitivity. b. The standard deviation
of the annualized continuously compounded rate of return of an asset. c. A
measure of uncertainty or risk.


volatility

A measure of the amount of change in the daily price of a security over a specified period of time. It is Uusually given as the standard deviation of the daily price changes of that security on an annual basis.


Volatility risk

The risk in the value of options portfolios due to the unpredictable changes in the volatility of
the underlying asset.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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