Financial Terms
Off-balance-sheet financing

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Definition of Off-balance-sheet financing

Off-balance-sheet Financing Image 1

Off-balance-sheet financing

financing that is not shown as a liability in a company's balance sheet.



Related Terms:

Asset-based financing

Methods of financing in which lenders and equity investors look principally to the
cash flow from a particular asset or set of assets for a return on, and the return of, their financing.


Asset-Based Financing

Loans granted usually by a financial institution where the asset being financed constitutes the sole security given to the lender.


Back-to-back financing

An intercompany loan channeled through a bank.


Balance of Merchandise Trade

The difference between exports and imports of goods.


Balance of payments

A statistical compilation formulated by a sovereign nation of all economic transactions
between residents of that nation and residents of all other nations during a stipulated period of time, usually a
calendar year.



Balance of Payments

The difference between the demand for and supply of a country's currency on the foreign exchange market.


Balance of Payments Accounts

A statement of a country's transactions with other countries.


Off-balance-sheet Financing Image 2

Balance of trade

Net flow of goods (exports minus imports) between countries.


Balance of Trade

See balance of merchandise trade.


Balance sheet

Also called the statement of financial condition, it is a summary of the assets, liabilities, and
owners' equity.


BALANCE SHEET

A “snapshot” statement that freezes a company on a particular day, like the last day of the year, and shows the balances in its asset, liability, and stockholders’ equity accounts. It’s governed by the formula:
Assets = Liabilities + Stockholders’ Equity.


Balance Sheet

A financial statement showing the financial position of a business – its assets, liabilities and
capital – at the end of an accounting period.


Balance Sheet

One of the basic financial statements; it lists the assets, liabilities, and equity accounts of the company. The balance sheet is prepared using the balances at the end of a specific day.


balance sheet

A term often used instead of the more formal and correct
term—statement of financial condition. This financial statement summarizes
the assets, liabilities, and owners’ equity sources of a business at a
given moment in time. It is prepared at the end of each profit period and
whenever else it is needed. It is one of the three primary financial statements
of a business, the other two being the income statement and the
statement of cash flows. The values reported in the balance sheet are the
amounts used to determine book value per share of capital stock. Also,
the book value of an asset is the amount reported in a business’s most
recent balance sheet.


Balance sheet

A report that summarizes all assets, liabilities, and equity for a company
for a given point in time.


balance sheet

Financial statement that shows the value of the
firm’s assets and liabilities at a particular time.


Off-balance-sheet Financing Image 3

Balance Sheet

A financial report showing the status of a company's assets, liabilities, and owners' equity on a given date.


Balance sheet exposure

See:accounting exposure.



Balance sheet identity

Total Assets = Total Liabilities + Total Stockholders' Equity


Balanced-Budget Multiplier

The multiplier associated with a change in government spending financed by an equal change in taxes.


Balanced fund

An investment company that invests in stocks and bonds. The same as a balanced mutual fund.


Balanced mutual fund

This is a fund that buys common stock, preferred stock and bonds. The same as a
balanced fund.


Balanced Scorecard

A system of non-financial performance measurement that links innovation, customer and process measures to financial performance.


balanced scorecard (BSC)

an approach to performance
measurement that weighs performance measures from four
perspectives: financial performance, an internal business
perspective, a customer perspective, and an innovation and
learning perspective


Basic balance

In a balance of payments, the basic balance is the net balance of the combination of the current
account and the capital account.


Bridge financing

Interim financing of one sort or another used to solidify a position until more permanent
financing is arranged.


Cash Flow Provided or Used from Financing Activities

Cash receipts and payments involving
liability and stockholders' equity items, including obtaining cash from creditors and repaying
the amounts borrowed and obtaining capital from owners and providing them with a return on,
and a return of, their investments.


Off-balance-sheet Financing Image 4

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES

A section on the cash-flow statement that shows how much cash a company raised by selling stocks or bonds this year and how much was paid out for cash dividends and other finance-related obligations.



common-size balance sheet

balance sheet that presents items as a percentage of total assets.


Compensating balance

An excess balance that is left in a bank to provide indirect compensation for loans
extended or services provided.


Cost of lease financing

A lease's internal rate of return.


Debt Financing

Raising loan capital through the creation of debt by issuing a form of paper evidencing amounts owed and payable on specified dates or on demand.


Debtor-in-possession financing

New debt obtained by a firm during the Chapter 11 bankruptcy process.


Declining balance

An accelerated depreciation method that calculates depreciation each year by applying a fixed rate to the asset’s book (cost–accumulated depreciation) value. Depreciation stops when the asset’s book value reaches its salvage value.


Declining-balance

A method of depreciation.


Double-declining-balance depreciation

Method of accelerated depreciation.


employee time sheet

a source document that indicates, for each employee, what jobs were worked on during the day and for what amount of time


Export Financing

A range of financing products (loans. guarantees, letters of credit, insurance etc.) in support of a variety of activities which help Canadian firms expand into new export markets.


Federal Financing Bank

A federal institution that lends to a wide array of federal credit agencies funds it
obtains by borrowing from the U.S. Treasury.


financing activities

One of the three classes of cash flows reported in the
statement of cash flows. This class includes borrowing money and paying
debt, raising money from shareowners and the return of money to
them, and dividends paid from profit.


financing decision

a judgment made regarding the method
of raising funds that will be used to make acquisitions; it
is based on an entity’s ability to issue and service debt and
equity securities


financing decision

Decision as to how to raise the money to pay for investments in real assets.


Financing decisions

Decisions concerning the liabilities and stockholders' equity side of the firm's balance
sheet, such as the decision to issue bonds.


Financing Instruments

This is a generic term that refers to the many different forms of financing a business may use. For example - loans, shares, and bonds are all considered financing instruments.


job order cost sheet

a source document that provides virtually
all the financial information about a particular job;
the set of all job order cost sheets for uncompleted jobs
composes the Work in Process Inventory subsidiary ledger


market-value balance sheet

Financial statement that uses the market value of all assets and liabilities.


Multi-option financing facility

A syndicated confirmed credit line with attached options.


Net cash balance

Beginning cash balance plus cash receipts minus cash disbursements.


Net financing cost

Also called the cost of carry or, simply, carry, the difference between the cost of financing
the purchase of an asset and the asset's cash yield. Positive carry means that the yield earned is greater than
the financing cost; negative carry means that the financing cost exceeds the yield earned.


On-hand balance

The quantity of inventory currently in stock, based on inventory
records.


Planned financing program

Program of short-term and long-term financing as outlined in the corporate
financial plan.


Production payment financing

A method of nonrecourse asset-based financing in which a specified
percentage of revenue realized from the sale of the project's output is used to pay debt service.


Project Financing

Debt finance, usually non-recourse, provided by financial institutions for the development and construction of a new project.


Projected available balance

The future planned balance of an inventory item,
based on the current balance and adjusted for planned receipts and usage.


Receivables balance fractions

The percentage of a month's sales that remain uncollected (and part of
accounts receivable) at the end of succeeding months.


Refinancing (Credit Insurance)

Extending the maturity date or increasing the amount of existing debt or both. Also, revising a payment schedule, usually to reduce the monthly payments and often to modify interest charges.


Remaining principal balance

The amount of principal dollars remaining to be paid under the mortgage as of
a given point in time.


Seed Financing/Capital

Generally, refers to the first contribution of capital toward the financing requirements of a start-up business.


Spreadsheet

A computer program that organizes numerical data into rows and columns on a terminal screen,
for calculating and making adjustments based on new data.


Target cash balance

Optimal amount of cash for a firm to hold, considering the trade-off between the
opportunity costs of holding too much cash and the trading costs of holding too little cash.


Term Sheet

A list of the major points of the proposed financing being offered by an investor.


Threshold for refinancing

The point when the WAC of an MBS is at a level to induce homeowners to
prepay the mortgage in order to refinance to a lower-rate mortgage, generally reached when the WAC of the
MBS is 2% or more above currently available mortgage rates.


Trial balance

A listing of all the accounts and their balances on a specified day.


zero-balance account

Regional bank account to which just enough funds are transferred daily to pay each day’s bills.


Zero-balance account (ZBA)

A checking account in which zero balance is maintained by transfers of funds
from a master account in an amount only large enough to cover checks presented.


statement of cash flows

One of the three primary financial statements
that a business includes in the periodic financial reports to its outside
shareowners and lenders. This financial statement summarizes the business’s
cash inflows and outflows for the period according to a threefold
classification: (1) cash flow from operating activities (cash flow from
profit), (2) cash flow from investing activities, and (3) cash flow from
financing activities. Frankly, the typical statement of cash flows is difficult
to read and decipher; it includes too many lines of information and
is fairly technical compared with the typical balance sheet and income
statement.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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