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Definition of Kit

Kit Image 1

Kit

A group of components needed to assemble a finished product that has been
clustered together for delivery to the shop floor.



Related Terms:

Aggregate Production Function

An equation determining aggregate output as a function of aggregate inputs such as labor and capital.


Bargain-purchase-price option

Gives the lessee the option to purchase the asset at a price below fair market
value when the lease expires.


by-product

an incidental output of a joint process; it is salable,
but the sales value of by-products is not substantial enough
for management to justify undertaking the joint process; it
is viewed as having a higher sales value than scrap


By-product

A product that is an ancillary part of the primary production process, having
a minor resale value in comparison to the value of the primary product being
manufactured. Any proceeds from the sale of a by-product are typically offset
against the cost of the primary product, or recorded as miscellaneous revenue.


By-product

A material created incidental to a production process, which can be
sold for value.



Cash delivery

The provision of some futures contracts that requires not delivery of underlying assets but
settlement according to the cash value of the asset.


Closing purchase

A transaction in which the purchaser's intention is to reduce or eliminate a short position in
a stock, or in a given series of options.


Kit Image 1

cost of production report

a process costing document that
details all operating and cost information, shows the computation
of cost per equivalent unit, and indicates cost assignment
to goods produced during the period


Delivery

The tender and receipt of an actual commodity or financial instrument in settlement of a futures contract.


Delivery notice

The written notice given by the seller of his intention to make delivery against an open, short
futures position on a particular date. Related: notice day


Delivery options

The options available to the seller of an interest rate futures contract, including the quality
option, the timing option, and the wild card option. delivery options make the buyer uncertain of which
Treasury Bond will be delivered or when it will be delivered.


Delivery points

Those points designated by futures exchanges at which the financial instrument or
commodity covered by a futures contract may be delivered in fulfillment of such contract.


Delivery policy

A company’s stated goal for how soon a customer order will be
shipped following receipt of that order.


Delivery price

The price fixed by the Clearing house at which deliveries on futures are in invoiced; also the
price at which the futures contract is settled when deliveries are made.


Delivery versus payment

A transaction in which the buyer's payment for securities is due at the time of
delivery (usually to a bank acting as agent for the buyer) upon receipt of the securities. The payment may be
made by bank wire, check, or direct credit to an account.


Direct stock-purchase programs

The purchase by investors of securities directly from the issuer.


Kit Image 2

economic components model

Abrams’ model for calculating DLOM based on the interaction of discounts from four economic components.
This model consists of four components: the measure of the economic impact of the delay-to-sale, monopsony power to buyers, and incremental transactions costs to both buyers and sellers.


economic production run (EPR)

an estimate of the number
of units to produce at one time that minimizes the total
costs of setting up production runs and carrying inventory



Equity floor

An agreement in which one party agrees to pay the other at specific time periods if a specific
stock market benchmark is less than a predetermined level.


equivalent units of production (EUP)

an approximation of the number of whole units of output that could have been
produced during a period from the actual effort expended
during that period; used in process costing systems to assign
costs to production


Factor of Production

A resource used to produce a good or service. The main macroeconomic factors of production are capital and labor.


Finished goods inventory

Goods that have been completed by the manufacturing
process, or purchased in a complete form, but which have not yet been sold to
customers.


Finished goods inventory

Completed inventory items ready for shipment to
customers.


Floor

Interest-rate option that guarantees that the rate on a floating-rate
loan will not fall below a certain level.
Forward curve
The curve of forward interest rates vs. maturity dates for bonds.


Floor broker

A member who is paid a fee for executing orders for clearing members or their customers. A
floor broker executing customer orders must be licensed by the CFTC.


Floor planning

Arrangement used to finance inventory. A finance company buys the inventory, which is then
held in trust by the user.


Floor stocks

Low-cost, high-usage inventory items stored near the shop floor,
which the production staff can use at will without a requisition and which are
expensed at the time of receipt, rather than being accounted for through a formal
inventory database.


Kit Image 3

Floor trader

A member who generally trades only for his own account, for an account controlled by him or
who has such a trade made for him. Also referred to as a "local".



Forward delivery

A transaction in which the settlement will occur on a specified date in the future at a price
agreed upon on the trade date.


Good delivery

A delivery in which everything - endorsement, any necessary attached legal papers, etc. - is in
order.


Good delivery and settlement procedures

Refers to PSA Uniform Practices such as cutoff times on delivery
of securities and notification, allocation, and proper endorsement.


grade (of product or service)

the addition or removal of product
or service characteristics to satisfy additional needs, especially price


Gross Domestic Product

Total output of final goods and services produced within a country during a year.


Gross domestic product (GDP)

The market value of goods and services produced over time including the
income of foreign corporations and foreign residents working in the U.S., but excluding the income of U.S.
residents and corporations overseas.


Gross National Product

Total output of final goods and services produced by a country's citizens during a year.


Gross national product (GNP)

Measures and economy's total income. It is equal to GDP plus the income
abroad accruing to domestic residents minus income generated in domestic market accruing to non-residents.


Group Life Insurance

This is a very common form of life insurance which is found in employee benefit plans and bank mortgage insurance. In employee benefit plans the form of this insurance is usually one year renewable term insurance. The cost of this coverage is based on the average age of everyone in the group. Therefore a group of young people would have inexpensive rates and an older group would have more expensive rates.
Some people rely on this kind of insurance as their primary coverage forgetting that group life insurance is a condition of employment with their employer. The coverage is not portable and cannot be taken with you if you change jobs. If you have a change in health, you may not qualify for new coverage at your new place of employment.
Bank mortgage insurance is also usually group insurance and you can tell this by virtue of the fact that you only receive a certificate of insurance, and not a complete policy. The only form in which bank mortgage insurance is sold is reducing term insurance, matching the declining mortgage balance. The only beneficiary that can be chosen for this kind of insurance is the bank. In both cases, employee benefit plan group insurance and bank mortgage insurance, the coverage is not guaranteed. This means that coverage can be cancelled by the insurance company underwriting that particular plan, if they are experiencing excessive claims.


Group of five (G5/G-5)

The five leading countries (France, Germany, Japan, United Kingdom, and the U.S.) that
meet periodically to achieve some cooperative effort on international economic issues. When currency issues
are discussed, the monetary authorities of these nations hold the meeting.


Group of seven (G7/G-7)

The G-5 countries plus Canada and Italy.


Group rotation manager

A top-down manager who infers the phases of the business cycle and allocates
assets accordingly.


Growth phase

A phase of development in which a company experiences rapid earnings growth as it produces
new products and expands market share.


Interest rate floor

An interest rate agreement in which payments are made when the reference rate falls
below the strike rate.


Investment product line (IPML)

The line of required returns for investment projects as a function of beta
(nondiversifiable risk).


Joint product

A product that has the highest sales value from among a group of products
that are the result of a joint production process.


Lean production

The technique of stripping all non-value-added activities from
the production process, thereby using the minimum possible amount of resources
to accomplish manufacturing goals.


Making delivery

Refers to the seller's actually turning over to the buyer the asset agreed upon in a forward contract.


Maturity phase

A phase of company development in which earnings continue to grow at the rate of the
general economy. Related: Three-phase DDM.


Minimum purchases

For mutual funds, the amount required to open a new account (Minimum Initial
Purchase) or to deposit into an existing account (Minimum Additional Purchase). These minimums may be
lowered for buyers participating in an automatic purchase plan


Money purchase plan

A defined benefit contribution plan in which the participant contributes some part and
the firm contributes at the same or a different rate. Also called and individual account plan.


National Income and Product Accounts

The national accounting system that records economic activity such as GDP and related measures.


Net Domestic Product

GDP minus depreciation.


Net National Product

GNP minus depreciation.


Non-production overhead

A general term referring to period costs, such as selling, administration and financial expenses.


Open-market purchase operation

A systematic program of repurchasing shares of stock in market
transactions at current market prices, in competition with other prospective investors.


open purchase ordering

a process by which a single purchase
order that expires at a set or determinable future
date is prepared to authorize a supplier to provide a large
quantity of one or more specified items on an as-requested
basis by the customer


Opening purchase

A transaction in which the purchaser's intention is to create or increase a long position in
a given series of options.


Opinion shopping

A practice prohibited by the SEC which involves attempts by a corporation to obtain
reporting objectives by following questionable accounting principles with the help of a pliable auditor willing
to go along with the desired treatment.


Overnight delivery risk

A risk brought about because differences in time zones between settlement centers
require that payment or delivery on one side of a transaction be made without knowing until the next day
whether the funds have been received in an account on the other side. Particularly apparent where delivery
takes place in Europe for payment in dollars in New York.


Point-of-use delivery

A delivery of stock to a location in or near the shop floor
adjacent to its area of use.


Preferred Stock Stock that has a claim on assets and dividends of a corporation that are prior

to that of common stock. Preferred stock typically does not carry the right to vote.


Process flow production

A production configuration in which products are continually
manufactured with minimal pauses or queuing.


process productivity

the total units produced during a period
using value-added processing time


Product

Any item intended for sale.


product complexity

an assessment about the number of components in a product


product contribution margin

the difference between selling price and variable cost of goods sold


Product cost

The cost of goods or services produced.


product cost

This is a key factor in the profit model of a business. product
cost is the same as purchase cost for a retailer or wholesaler (distributor).
A manufacturer has to accumulate three different types of production
costs to determine product cost: direct materials, direct labor, and
manufacturing overhead. The cost of products (goods) sold is deducted
from sales revenue to determine gross margin (also called gross profit),
which is the first profit line reported in an external income statement
and in an internal profit report to managers.


product cost

a cost associated with making or acquiring inventory


Product cost

The total of all costs assigned to a product, typically including direct
labor, materials (with normal spoilage included), and overhead.


Product cycle

The time it takes to bring new and/or improved products to market.


product life cycle

a model depicting the stages through
which a product class (not necessarily each product) passes


product line margin

see segment margin


Product market

A business’s investment in technology, people and materials in order to make, buy and sell products or services to customers.


product- (or process-) level cost

a cost that is caused by the development, production, or acquisition of specific products or services


Product risk

A type of mortgage-pipeline risk that occurs when a lender has an unusual loan in production or
inventory but does not have a sale commitment at a prearranged price.


Product/service mix

See sales mix.


product variety

the number of different types of products
produced (or services rendered) by a firm


Production-flow commitment

An agreement by the loan purchaser to allow the monthly loan quota to be
delivered in batches.


Production overhead

A general term referring to indirect costs.


Production payment financing

A method of nonrecourse asset-based financing in which a specified
percentage of revenue realized from the sale of the project's output is used to pay debt service.


Production yield variance

The difference between the actual and budgeted proportions
of product resulting from a production process, multiplied by the standard unit cost.


productive capacity

the number of total units that could be
produced during a period based on available equipment time
productive processing time the proportion of total time that
is value-added time; also known as manufacturing cycle
efficiency


Productivity

Output per unit of input, usually measured as output per hour of labor.


Purchase

To buy, to be long, to have an ownership position.


Purchase accounting

Method of accounting for a merger in which the acquirer is treated as having purchased
the assets and assumed liabilities of the acquiree, which are all written up or down to their respective fair
market values, the difference between the purchase price and the net assets acquired being attributed to goodwill.


Purchase agreement

As used in connection with project financing, an agreement to purchase a specific
amount of project output per period.


Purchase Agreement

This legal document records the final understanding of the parties with respect to the proposed transaction.


Purchase and sale

A method of securities distribution in which the securities firm purchases the securities
from the issuer for its own account at a stated price and then resells them, as contrasted with a best-efforts sale.


Purchase discounts

A contra account that reduces purchases by the amount of the discounts taken for early payment.


Purchase fund

Resembles a sinking fund except that money is used only to purchase bonds if they are selling
below their par value.


Purchase method

Accounting for an acquisition using market value for the consolidation of the two entities'
net assets on the balance sheet. Generally, depreciation/amortization will increase for this method compared
with pooling and will result in lower net income.


Purchase method

An accounting method used to combine the financial statements of
companies. This involves recording the acquired assets at fair market value, and the
excess of the purchase price over this value as goodwill, which will be amortized
over time.


Purchase price

Price actually paid for a security. Typically the purchase
price of a bond is not the same as the redemption value.


Purchase returns

A contra account that reduces purchases by the amount of items purchased that were subsequently returned.


Purchased In-Process Research and Development

Unfinished research and development that is acquired from another firm.


Purchases

Items purchased by the company for the purpose of resale.


Purchases journal

A journal used to record the transactions that result in a credit to accounts payable.


purchasing cost

the quoted price of inventory minus any
discounts allowed plus shipping charges


Purchasing power parity

The notion that the ratio between domestic and foreign price levels should equal
the equilibrium exchange rate between domestic and foreign currencies.


Purchasing Power Parity

Theory that says that over the long run exchange rate changes offset any difference between foreign and domestic inflation. This result assumes that the real exchange rate remains constant, something that is not true even in the long run.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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