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Conglomerate merger

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Definition of Conglomerate merger

Conglomerate Merger Image 1

Conglomerate merger

A merger involving two or more firms that are in unrelated businesses.



Related Terms:

Conglomerate

A firm engaged in two or more unrelated businesses.


Horizontal merger

A merger involving two or more firms in the same industry that are both at the same
stage in the production cycle; that is two or more competitors.


Limitation on merger, consolidation, or sale

A bond covenant that restricts in some way a firm's ability to
merge or consolidate with another firm.


Merger

1) Acquisition in which all assets and liabilities are absorbed by the buyer.
2) More generally, any combination of two companies.


Merger

The combination of two or more entities into a single entity, usually with one
of the original entities retaining control.



merger

Combination of two firms into one, with the acquirer assuming assets and liabilities of the target firm.


Vertical merger

A merger in which one firm acquires another firm that is in the same industry but at another
stage in the production cycle. For example, the firm being acquired serves as a supplier to the firm doing the acquiring.


Conglomerate Merger Image 1

Horizontal acquisition

Merger between two companies producing similar goods or services.


Horizontal analysis

The process of dividing each expense item of a given year by the same expense item in
the base year. This allows for the exploration of changes in the relative importance of expense items over time
and the behavior of expense items as sales change.


Horizontal spread

The simultaneous purchase and sale of two options that differ only in their exercise date.


45-Degree Line

A line representing equilibrium in the goods and services market, on a diagram with aggregate demand on the vertical axis and aggregate supply on the horizontal axis.


High-low-close chart

A financial chart usually used to plot the high, low,
open, and close price of a security over time. Plots are vertical lines whose top
is the high, bottom is the low, open is a short horizontal tick to the left, and
close is a short horizontal tick to the right.


Indifference curve

The graphical expression of a utility function, where the horizontal axis measures risk and
the vertical axis measures expected return. The curve connects all portfolios with the same utilities according
to g and s .


Vertical spread

Simultaneous purchase and sale of two options that differ only in their exercise price. See:
horizontal spread.


Yield curve

Graph of yields (vertical axis) of a particular type of security
versus the time to maturity (horizontal axis). This curve usually slopes
upward, indicating that investors usually expect to receive a premium for
securities that have a longer time to maturity. The benchmark yield curve is
for U.S. Treasury securities with maturities ranging from three months to 30
years. See Term structure.


Affirmative covenant

A bond covenant that specifies certain actions the firm must take.


Conglomerate Merger Image 1

Aggregate Production Function

An equation determining aggregate output as a function of aggregate inputs such as labor and capital.


Budget cycle

The annual period over which budgets are prepared.



Business cycle

Repetitive cycles of economic expansion and recession.


Business Cycle

Fluctuations of GDP around its long-run trend, consisting of recession, trough, expansion, and peak.


Cash conversion cycle

The length of time between a firm's purchase of inventory and the receipt of cash
from accounts receivable.


cash conversion cycle

Period between firm’s payment for materials
and collection on its sales.


Cash cycle

In general, the time between cash disbursement and cash collection. In net working capital
management, it can be thought of as the operating cycle less the accounts payable payment period.


Cash Cycle

The length of time between a purchase of materials and collection of accounts receivable generated by the sale of the products made from the materials.


Confirmation

he written statement that follows any "trade" in the securities markets. Confirmation is issued
immediately after a trade is executed. It spells out settlement date, terms, commission, etc.


cost of production report

a process costing document that
details all operating and cost information, shows the computation
of cost per equivalent unit, and indicates cost assignment
to goods produced during the period


Cycle counting

The frequent, scheduled counting of a subset of all inventories,
with the intent of spotting inventory record inaccuracies, investigating root
causes, and correcting those problems.


Conglomerate Merger Image 2

cycle time

the time between the placement of an order to
the time the goods arrive for usage or are produced by
the company; it is equal to value-added time plus nonvalue-
added time



economic production run (EPR)

an estimate of the number
of units to produce at one time that minimizes the total
costs of setting up production runs and carrying inventory


equivalent units of production (EUP)

an approximation of the number of whole units of output that could have been
produced during a period from the actual effort expended
during that period; used in process costing systems to assign
costs to production


Expiration cycle

An expiration cycle relates to the dates on which options on a particular security expire. A
given option will be placed in 1 of 3 cycles, the January cycle, the February cycle, or the March cycle. At any
point in time, an option will have contracts with 4 expiration dates outstanding, 2 in near-term months and 2
in far-term months.


Factor of Production

A resource used to produce a good or service. The main macroeconomic factors of production are capital and labor.


Firm

Refers to an order to buy or sell that can be executed without confirmation for some fixed period. Also,
a synonym for company.


Firm commitment underwriting

An undewriting in which an investment banking firm commits to buy the
entire issue and assumes all financial responsibility for any unsold shares.


Firm's net value of debt

Total firm value minus total firm debt.


Firm-specific risk

See:diversifiable risk or unsystematic risk.


Industry

The category describing a company's primary business activity. This category is usually determined
by the largest portion of revenue.


Intrinsic value of a firm

The present value of a firm's expected future net cash flows discounted by the
required rate of return.


Lean production

The technique of stripping all non-value-added activities from
the production process, thereby using the minimum possible amount of resources
to accomplish manufacturing goals.


life cycle costing

the accumulation of costs for activities that
occur over the entire life cycle of a product from inception
to abandonment by the manufacturer and consumer


Lifecycle costing

An approach to costing that estimates and accumulates the costs of a product/service over
its entire lifecycle, i.e. from inception to abandonment.


Limitation on merger, consolidation, or sale

A bond covenant that restricts in some way a firm's ability to
merge or consolidate with another firm.


manufacturing cycle efficiency (MCE)

a ratio resulting from dividing the actual production time by total lead time;
reflects the proportion of lead time that is value-added


Market cycle

The period between the 2 latest highs or lows of the S&P 500, showing net performance of a
fund through both an up and a down market. A market cycle is complete when the S&P is 15% below the
highest point or 15% above the lowest point (ending a down market). The dates of the last market cycle are:
12/04/87 to 10/11/90 (low to low).


Merger

1) Acquisition in which all assets and liabilities are absorbed by the buyer.
2) more generally, any combination of two companies.


Merger

The combination of two or more entities into a single entity, usually with one
of the original entities retaining control.


merger

Combination of two firms into one, with the acquirer assuming assets and liabilities of the target firm.


Neglected firm effect

The tendency of firms that are neglected by security analysts to outperform firms that
are the subject of considerable attention.


network organization

a flexible organization structure that
establishes a working relationship among multiple entities,
usually to pursue a single function


Non-production overhead

A general term referring to period costs, such as selling, administration and financial expenses.


Operating cycle

The average time intervening between the acquisition of materials or services and the final
cash realization from those acquisitions.


Payroll Cycle

The period of service for which a company compensates its employees.


Political Business Cycle

A business cycle caused by policies undertaken to help a government be re-elected.


Process flow production

A production configuration in which products are continually
manufactured with minimal pauses or queuing.


Product cycle

The time it takes to bring new and/or improved products to market.


product life cycle

a model depicting the stages through
which a product class (not necessarily each product) passes


Production-flow commitment

An agreement by the loan purchaser to allow the monthly loan quota to be
delivered in batches.


Production overhead

A general term referring to indirect costs.


Production payment financing

A method of nonrecourse asset-based financing in which a specified
percentage of revenue realized from the sale of the project's output is used to pay debt service.


Production yield variance

The difference between the actual and budgeted proportions
of product resulting from a production process, multiplied by the standard unit cost.


Real Business Cycle Theory

Belief that business cycles arise from real shocks to the economy, such as technology advances and natural resource discoveries, and have little to do with monetary policy.


Replacement cycle

The frequency with which an asset is replaced by an equivalent asset.


Small-firm effect

The tendency of small firms (in terms of total market capitalization) to outperform the
stock market (consisting of both large and small firms).


Target firm

A firm that is the object of a takeover by another firm.


two-bin system

an inventory ordering system in which two
containers (or stacks) of raw materials or parts are available
for use; when one container is depleted, the removal
of materials from the second container begins and a purchase
order is placed to refill the first container


Two-bin system

A system in which parts are reordered when their supply in one
storage bin is exhausted, requiring usage from a backup bin until the replenishment
arrives.


Two-factor model

Black's zero-beta version of the capital asset pricing model.


Two-fund separation theorem

The theoretical result that all investors will hold a combination of the riskfree
asset and the market portfolio.


Two-sided market

A market in which both bid and asked prices, good for the standard unit of trading, are quoted.


Two-state option pricing model

An option pricing model in which the underlying asset can take on only two
possible (discrete) values in the next time period for each value it can take on in the preceding time period.
Also called the binomial option pricing model.


Two-tier tax system

A method of taxation in which the income going to shareholders is taxed twice.


UNITS OF PRODUCTION

A depreciation method that relates a machine’s depreciation to the number of units it makes each
accounting period. The method requires that someone record the machine’s output each year.


Vertical merger

A merger in which one firm acquires another firm that is in the same industry but at another
stage in the production cycle. For example, the firm being acquired serves as a supplier to the firm doing the acquiring.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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