Financial Terms
FIFO (First In, First Out)

Main Page

Alphabetical
Index

SEARCH


Information about financial, finance, business, accounting, payroll, inventory, investment, money, inventory control, stock trading, financial advisor, tax advisor, credit.

 


Main Page: finance, financial advisor, payroll, investment, financial, inventory, stock trading, accounting,

Definition of FIFO (First In, First Out)

FIFO (First In, First Out) Image 1

FIFO (First In, First Out)

An inventory valuation method that presumes that the first units received were the first ones
sold.



Related Terms:

First in, first-out costing method (FIFO)

A process costing methodology that assigns the earliest
cost of production and materials to those units being sold, while the latest costs
of production and materials are assigned to those units still retained in inventory.


First-In-First-Out (FIFO)

A method of valuing the cost of goods sold that uses the cost of the oldest item in
inventory first.


First-in, first-out (FIFO)

A method of accounting for inventory.


First-in, first-out (FIFO)

An inventory valuation method under which one assumes that the
first inventory item to be stored in a bin is the first one to be used, irrespective of
actual usage.


First-In, First-Out (FIFO) Inventory Method

The inventory cost-flow assumption that
assigns the earliest inventory acquisition costs to cost of goods sold. The most recent inventory
acquisition costs are assumed to remain in ending inventory.



Borrower fallout

In the mortgage pipeline, the risk that prospective borrowers of loans committed to be
closed will elect to withdraw from the contract.


Breakout

A rise in a security's price above a resistance level (commonly its previous high price) or drop
below a level of support (commonly the former lowest price.) A breakout is taken to signify a continuing
move in the same direction. Can be used by technical analysts as a buy or sell indicator.


FIFO (First In, First Out) Image 2

Buyout

Purchase of a controlling interest (or percent of shares) of a company's stock. A leveraged buy-out is
done with borrowed money.


Cashout

Refers to a situation where a firm runs out of cash and cannot readily sell marketable securities.


Crowding Out

Decreases in aggregate demand which accompany an expansionary fiscal policy, dampening the impact of that policy.


Customary payout ratios

A range of payout ratios that is typical based on an analysis of comparable firms.


Days' sales outstanding

Average collection period.


Dividend payout ratio

Percentage of earnings paid out as dividends.


dividend payout ratio

Computed by dividing cash dividends for the year
by the net income for the year. It’s simply the percent of net income distributed
as cash dividends for the year.


dividend payout ratio

Percentage of earnings paid out as dividends.


Down-and-out option

Barrier option that expires if asset price hits a barrier.


FIFO (First In, First Out) Image 3

Fallout risk

A type of mortgage pipeline risk that is generally created when the terms of the loan to be
originated are set at the same time as the sale terms are set. The risk is that either of the two parties, borrower
or investor, fails to close and the loan "falls out" of the pipeline.


Feasible target payout ratios

Payout ratios that are consistent with the availability of excess funds to make
cash dividend payments.



FIFO method (of process costing)

the method of cost assignment that computes an average cost per equivalent
unit of production for the current period; keeps beginning
inventory units and costs separate from current period production
and costs


First-call

With CMOs, the start of the cash flow cycle for the cash flow window.


First notice day

The first day, varying by contracts and exchanges, on which notices of intent to deliver
actual financial instruments or physical commodities against futures are authorized.


First-pass regression

A time series regression to estimate the betas of securities portfolios.


First To Die Coverage

This means that there are two or more life insured on the same policy but the death benefit is paid out on the first death only. If two or more persons at the same address are purchasing life insurance at the same time, it is wise to compare the cost of this kind of coverage with individual policies having a multiple policy discount.


Freight out

The transportation cost associated with the delivery of goods from a company
to its customers.


Full-Employment Output

The level of output produced by the economy when operating at the natural rate of unemployment.


Full-payout lease

See: financial lease.


input-output coefficient

a number (prefaced as a multiplier
to an unknown variable) that indicates the rate at which each
decision variable uses up (or depletes) the scarce resource


FIFO (First In, First Out) Image 4

Input-output tables

Tables that indicate how much each industry requires of the production of each other
industry in order to produce each dollar of its own output.



Investor fallout

In the mortgage pipeline, risk that occurs when the originator commits loan terms to the
borrowers and gets commitments from investors at the time of application, or if both sets of terms are made at closing.


Last-In-First-Out (LIFO)

A method of valuing inventory that uses the cost of the most recent item in
inventory first.


Last-in, first-out (LIFO)

An inventory costing methodology that bases the recognized cost of
sales on the most recent costs incurred, while the cost of ending inventory is based
on the earliest costs incurred. The underlying reasoning for this costing system is
the assumption that goods are sold in the reverse order of their manufacture.


Last-in, first-out (LIFO)

An inventory valuation method under which one assumes that the
last inventory item to be stored in a bin is the first one to be used, irrespective of
actual usage.


Last-In, First-Out (LIFO) Inventory Method

The inventory cost-flow assumption that assigns the most recent inventory acquisition costs to cost of goods sold. The earliest inventory
acquisition costs are assumed to remain in ending inventory.


Last-in, first-out (LILO)

A method of accounting for inventory.


Leveraged buyout

The purchase of one business entity by another, largely using borrowed
funds. The borrowings are typically paid off through the future cash flow of
the purchased entity.


Leveraged buyout (LBO)

A transaction used for taking a public corporation private financed through the use
of debt funds: bank loans and bonds. Because of the large amount of debt relative to equity in the new
corporation, the bonds are typically rated below investment grade, properly referred to as high-yield bonds or
junk bonds. Investors can participate in an LBO through either the purchase of the debt (i.e., purchase of the
bonds or participation in the bank loan) or the purchase of equity through an LBO fund that specializes in
such investments.


leveraged buyout (LBO)

Acquisition of the firm by a private group using substantial borrowed funds.


LIFO (Last-in-first-out)

The last-in-first-out inventory valuation methodology. A method of valuing
inventory that uses the cost of the most recent item in inventory first.


LIFO (Last In, First Out)

An inventory valuation method that presumes that the last units received were the first ones
sold.


Lock-out

With PAC bond CMO classes, the period before the PAC sinking fund becomes effective. With
multifamily loans, the period of time during which prepayment is prohibited.


Management buyout (MBO)

Leveraged buyout whereby the acquiring group is led by the firm's management.


management buyout (MBO)

Acquisition of the firm by its own management in a leveraged buyout.


modified FIFO method (of process costing)

the method of cost assignment that uses fifo to compute a cost per
equivalent unit but, in transferring units from a department,
the costs of the beginning inventory units and the
units started and completed are combined and averaged


National Output

GDP.


Netting out

To get or bring in as a net; to clear as profit.


Odd first or last period

Fixed-income securities may be purchased on dates
that do not coincide with coupon or payment dates. The length of the first and
last periods may differ from the regular period between coupons, and thus the
bond owner is not entitled to the full value of the coupon for that period.
Instead, the coupon is pro-rated according to how long the bond is held during
that period.


Open-outcry

The method of trading used at futures exchanges, typically involving calling out the specific
details of a buy or sell order, so that the information is available to all traders.


out-of-pocket cost

a cost that is a current or near-current cash expenditure


Out-of-the-money option

A call option is out-of-the-money if the strike price is greater than the market price
of the underlying security. A put option is out-of-the-money if the strike price is less than the market price of
the underlying security.


Outbound stock point

A designated inventory location on the shop floor between
operations where inventory is stockpiled until needed by the next operation.


outlier

an abnormal or nonrepresentative point within a data set


Output Gap

The difference between full employment output and current output.


Outright rate

Actual forward rate expressed in dollars per currency unit, or vice versa.
outsourcing
he practice of purchasing a significant percentage of intermediate components from outside suppliers.


outsourcing

the use, by one company, of an external
provider of a service or manufacturer of a component


Outsourcing

The process of shifting a function previously performed internally
to a supplier who is responsible to the company for its ongoing operations and
results.


outsourcing decision

see make-or-buy decision


Outstanding share capital

Issued share capital less the par value of shares that are held in the company's treasury.


Outstanding shares

Shares that are currently owned by investors.


Outstanding shares

The number of shares that are in the hands of the public. The difference between issued shares and outstanding shares is the shares held as treasury stock.


outstanding shares

Shares that have been issued by the company and are held by investors.


Payout ratio

Generally, the proportion of earnings paid out to the common stockholders as cash dividends.
More specifically, the firm's cash dividend divided by the firm's earnings in the same reporting period.


payout ratio

Fraction of earnings paid out as dividends.


Perfected first lien

A first lien that is duly recorded with the cognizant governmental body so that the lender
will be able to act on it should the borrower default.


Potential Output or Potential GDP

output produced when the economy is operating at its natural rate of unemployment.


Priced out

The market has already incorporated information, such as a low dividend, into the price of a stock.


Routing

A list of all the labour or machining processes and times required to convert raw materials into finished goods or to deliver a service.


routing document

see operations flow document


Stockout

Running out of inventory.


stockout

the condition of not having inventory available
upon need or request


Stockout

The absence of any form of inventory when needed.


strict FIFO method (of process costing)

the method of cost assignment that uses fifo to compute a cost per equivalent unit and, in transferring units from a department, keeps the
cost of the beginning units separate from the cost of the
units started and completed during the current period


Take-out

A cash surplus generated by the sale of one block of securities and the purchase of another, e.g.
selling a block of bonds at 99 and buying another block at 95. Also, a bid made to a seller of a security that is
designed (and generally agreed) to take him out of the market.


Target payout ratio

A firm's long-run dividend-to-earnings ratio. The firm's policy is to attempt to pay out a
certain percentage of earnings, but it pays a stated dollar dividend and adjusts it to the target as base-line
increases in earnings occur.


Without

If 70 were bid in the market and there was no offer, the quote would be "70 bid without." The
expression "without" indicates a one-way market.


Without recourse

Without the lender having any right to seek payment or seize assets in the event of
nonpayment from anyone other than the party (such as a special-purpose entity) specified in the debt contract.


Workout

Informal arrangement between a borrower and creditors.


workout

Agreement between a company and its creditors establishing the steps the company must take to avoid bankruptcy.


Workout period

Realignment period of a temporary misaligned yield relationship that sometimes occurs in
fixed income markets.



 

 

 

 

 

 

Related to : financial, finance, business, accounting, payroll, inventory, investment, money, inventory control, stock trading, financial advisor, tax advisor, credit.


Copyright© 2019 www.finance-lib.com