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Comprehensive due diligence investigation

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Definition of Comprehensive due diligence investigation

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Comprehensive due diligence investigation

The investigation of a firm's business in conjunction with a
securities offering to determine whether the firm's business and financial situation and its prospects are
adequately disclosed in the prospectus for the offering.



Related Terms:

Annuity due

An annuity with n payments, wherein the first payment is made at time t = 0 and the last
payment is made at time t = n - 1.


Due bill

An instrument evidencing the obligation of a seller to deliver securities sold to the buyer.
Occasionally used in the bill market.


Annuity Due

Annuity where the payments are to be made at the beginning of
each period


annuity due

a series of equal cash flows being received or paid at the beginning of a period


annuity due

Level stream of cash flows starting immediately.



Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income

Cumulative gains or losses reported in shareholders'
equity that arise from changes in the fair value of available-for-sale securities, from the
effects of changes in foreign-currency exchange rates on consolidated foreign-currency financial
statements, certain gains and losses on financial derivatives, and from adjustments for underfunded
pension plans.


Due Diligence

The process of systematically evaluating information, to identify risks and issues relating to a proposed transaction.(i.e. verify that information is what it is proposed to be).


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ADF (annuity discount factor)

the present value of a finite stream of cash flows for every beginning $1 of cash flow.


Annuity

A regular periodic payment made by an insurance company to a policyholder for a specified period
of time.


Annuity factor

Present value of $1 paid for each of t periods.


Annuity in arrears

An annuity with a first payment on full period hence, rather than immediately.


Bill of exchange

General term for a document demanding payment.


Bill of lading

A contract between the exporter and a transportation company in which the latter agrees to
transport the goods under specified conditions which limit its liability. It is the exporter's receipt for the goods
as well as proof that goods have been or will be received.


Cash management bill

Very short maturity bills that the Treasury occasionally sells because its cash
balances are down and it needs money for a few days.


Deferred nominal life annuity

A monthly fixed-dollar payment beginning at retirement age. It is nominal
because the payment is fixed in dollar amount at any particular time, up to and including retirement.


Equivalent annual annuity

The equivalent amount per year for some number of years that has a present
value equal to a given amount.


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Invoice billing

billing system in which the invoices are sent off at the time of customer orders are all separate
bills to be paid.


Normal annuity form

The manner in which retirement benefits are paid out.



RAMs (Reverse-annuity mortgages)

Mortgages in which the bank makes a loan for an amount equal to a
percentage of the appraisal value of the home. The loan is then paid to the homeowner in the form of an
annuity.


Single-premium deferred annuity

An insurance policy bought by the sponsor of a pension plan for a single
premium. In return, the insurance company agrees to make lifelong payments to the employee (the
policyholder) when that employee retires.


Statement billing

billing method in which the sales for a period such as a month (for which a customer also
receives invoices) are collected into a single statement and the customer must pay all of the invoices
represented on the statement.


Tax anticipation bills (TABs)

Special bills that the Treasury occasionally issues that mature on corporate
quarterly income tax dates and can be used at face value by corporations to pay their tax liabilities.


Treasury bills

Debt obligations of the U.S. Treasury that have maturities of one year or less. Maturities for Tbills
are usually 91 days, 182 days, or 52 weeks.


U.S. Treasury bill

U.S. government debt with a maturity of less than a year.


Bill of materials

A listing of all the materials and quantities that go to make up a completed product.


Annuity

A series of payments or deposits of equal size spaced evenly over
a specified period of time


Ordinary Annuity

An annuity where the payments are made at the end of each
period


bill of materials

a document that contains information about
the product materials components and their specifications
(including quality and quantities needed)



ordinary annuity

a series of equal cash flows being received
or paid at the end of a period


Annuity

A series of payments over a period of time. The payments are usually
in equal amounts and usually at regular intervals such as quarterly,
semi-annually, or annually.


Treasury bill

Short-term U.S. government security issued at a discount from
the face value and paying the face value at maturity.


Bill of materials

An itemization of the parts and subassemblies required to create a
product, frequently including assumed scrap rates that will arise as part of the production
process.


annuity

Equally spaced level stream of cash flows.


annuity factor

Present value of an annuity of $1 per period.


T-bill

See Treasury bill.


Treasury Bill

A short-term (less than one year) government discount bond.


Individual Retirement Annuity

An IRA comprised of an annuity that is managed
through and paid out by a life insurance company.


Bill and Hold Practices

Products that have been sold with an explicit agreement that delivery
will occur at a later, often yet-to-be-determined, date.
Capitalize To report an expenditure or accrual as an asset as opposed to expensing it and charging it against earnings currently.


Cost Plus Estimated Earnings in Excess of Billings

Revenue recognized to date under the percentage-of-completion method in excess of amounts billed. Also known as unbilled accounts
receivable.


Unbilled Accounts Receivable

Revenue recognized under the percentage-of-completion
method in excess of amounts billed. Also known as cost plus estimated earnings in excess of
billings.


Bill of materials (BOM)

A listing of all parts and subassemblies required to produce one
unit of a finished product, including the required number of units of each part
and subassembly.


Breeder bill of materials

A bill of material that accounts for the generation and
cost implications of byproducts as a result of manufacturing the parent item.


Indented bill of material

A bill of material reporting format under which successively
lower levels of components are indented farther away from the left
margin.


Matrix bill of material

A bill of materials chart listing the bills for similar products,
which is useful for determining common components.


Modular bill of material

A bill of material format in which components and subassemblies
are clustered by product option, so one can more easily plan for the
assembly of finished goods with different configurations.


Multilevel bill of material

An itemization of all bill of material components, including
a nested categorization of all components used for subassemblies.


Phantom bill of material

A bill of materials for a subassembly that is not normally
kept in stock, because it is used at once as part of a higher-level assembly or
finished product.


Repair bill of material

A special bill itemizing changes needed to refurbish an
existing product.


Single-level bill of material

A list of all components used in a parent item.


Summarized bill of materials

A bill of materials format showing the grand total
usage requirement for each component of a finished product.


Annuity

A contract which provides an income for a specified period of time, such as a certain number of years or for life. An annuity is like a life insurance policy in reverse. The purchaser gives the life insurance company a lump sum of money and the life insurance company pays the purchaser a regular income, usually monthly.


Back To Back Annuity

This term refers to the simultaneous issue of a life annuity with a non-guaranteed period and a guaranteed life insurance policy [usually whole life or term to 100]. The face value of the life insurance would be the same amount that was used to purchase the annuity. This combination of life annuity providing the highest payout of all types of annuities, along with a guaranteed life insurance policy allowed an uninsurable person to convert his/her RRSP into the best choice of annuity and guarantee that upon his/her death, the full value of the annuity would be paid tax free through the life insurance policy to his family members. However, in the early 1990's, the Federal tax authorities put a stop to the issuing of standard life rates to rated or uninsurable applicants. Insuring a life annuity in this manner is still an excellent way to provide guaranteed tax free funds to family members but the application for the annuity and the application for the life insurance are separate transactions and today, most likely conducted through two different insurance companies so that there is no suspicion of preferential treatment given to the life insurance application.


Deferred Annuity

An annuity providing for income payments to commence at a specified future time.


Treasury Bill

Short-term government security.


online bill payment

The electronic payment of a bill via the Internet. The specified amount of the bill is electronically debited from your account.


Annuity

Periodic payments made to an individual under the terms of the policy.


Annuity Period

The time between each payment under an annuity.


Guaranteed Interest Annuity (GIA)

Interest bearing investment with fixed rate and term.


Variable Annuity

A form of annuity policy under which the amount of each benefit is not guaranteed or specified. The amounts fluctuate according to the earnings of a separate investment account.


Registered Pension Plan

Commonly referred to as an RPP this is a tax sheltered employee group plan approved by Federal and Provincial governments allowing employees to have deductions made directly from their wages by their employer with a resulting reduction of income taxes at source. These plans are easy to implement but difficult to dissolve should the group have a change of heart. Employer contributions are usually a percentage of the employee's salary, typically from 3% to 5%, with a maximum of the lessor of 20% or $3,500 per annum. The employee has the same right of contribution. Vesting is generally set at 2 years, which means that the employee has right of ownership of both his/her and his/her employers contributions to the plan after 2 years. It also means that all contributions are locked in after 2 years and cannot be cashed in for use by the employee in a low income year. Should the employee change jobs, these funds can only be transferred to the RPP of a new employer or the funds can be transferred to an individual RRSP (or any number of RRSPs) but in either scenario, the funds are locked in and cannot be accessed until at least age 60. The only choices available to access locked in RPP funds after age 60 are the conversion to a Life Income Fund or a Unisex annuity.
To further define an RPP, Registered Pension Plans take two forms; Defined Benefit or Defined Contribution (also known as money purchase plans). The Defined Benefit plan establishes the amount of money in advance that is to be paid out at retirement based usually on number of years of employee service and various formulae involving percentages of average employee earnings. The Defined Benefit plan is subject to constant government scrutiny to make certain that sufficient contributions are being made to provide for the predetermined pension payout. On the other hand, the Defined Contribution plan is considerably easier to manage. The employer simply determines the percentage to be contributed within the prescribed limits. Whatever amount has grown in the employee's reserve by retirement determines how much the pension payout will be by virtue of the amount of LIF or annuity payout it will purchase.
The most simple group RRSP plan is a group billed RRSP. This means that each employee has his own RRSP plan and the employer deducts the contributions directly from the employee's wages and sends them directly to the RRSP plan administrator. Regular RRSP rules apply in that maximum contribution in the current year is the lessor of 18% or $13,500. Generally, to encourage this kind of plan, the employer also agrees to make a regular contribution to the employee's plans, knowing full well that any contributions made immediately belong to the employee. Should the employee change jobs, he/she can take their plan with them and continue making contributions or cash it in and pay tax in the year in which the money is taken into income.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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