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Liquidity diversification

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Definition of Liquidity diversification

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Liquidity diversification

Investing in a variety of maturities to reduce the price risk to which holding long
bonds exposes the investor.



Related Terms:

Accounting liquidity

The ease and quickness with which assets can be converted to cash.


Diversification

Dividing investment funds among a variety of securities with different risk, reward, and
correlation statistics so as to minimize unsystematic risk.


Diversification

The process of spreading a portfolio over many investments to
avoid excessive exposure to any one source of risk


diversification

Strategy designed to reduce risk by spreading the portfolio across many investments.


Diversification

Investing so that all your eggs are not in the same basket. By spreading your investments over different kinds of investments, you cushion your portfolio against sudden swings in any one area. Segregated equity funds have become a popular and secure way for average investors to get the benefits of greater diversification.



diversification

An investment technique intended to minimize risk by utilizing a wide variety of investments within a portfolio. In a diversified portfolio, a decline in the value of one investment, for example, should be offset by the strength of other investments.


Efficient diversification

The organizing principle of modern portfolio theory, which maintains that any riskaverse
investor will search for the highest expected return for any level of portfolio risk.


Liquidity Diversification Image 2

International diversification

The attempt to reduce risk by investing in the more than one nation. By
diversifying across nations whose economic cycles are not perfectly correlated, investors can typically reduce
the variability of their returns.


Liquidity

A market is liquid when it has a high level of trading activity, allowing buying and selling with
minimum price disturbance. Also a market characterized by the ability to buy and sell with relative ease.


Liquidity

A measure of the ability of a business to pay its debts as they fall due – see also working capital.


Liquidity

A term that means nearness to cash; the closer an asset is to becoming cash or a liability is to using cash, the more liquid that asset or liability is.


Liquidity

The ease with which assets or securities can be sold for cash on
short notice at a fair price


liquidity

Ability of an asset to be converted to cash quickly at low cost.


Liquidity

Ease with which an asset can be sold on short notice at a fair price.


Liquidity

The degree to which an asset can be cheaply and quickly turned into money.


Liquidity Crisis

Situation in which a firm is unable to meet due bills; a period of "technical insolvency".


Liquidity preference hypothesis

The argument that greater liquidity is valuable, all else equal. Also, the
theory that the forward rate exceeds expected future interest rates.


Liquidity premium

Forward rate minus expected future short-term interest rate.



Liquidity ratios

Ratios that measure a firm's ability to meet its short-term financial obligations on time.


Liquidity ratios

Ratios that measure a firm's ability to meet its short-term financial obligations on time.


Liquidity risk

The risk that arises from the difficulty of selling an asset. It can be thought of as the difference
between the "true value" of the asset and the likely price, less commissions.


Liquidity theory of the term structure

A biased expectations theory that asserts that the implied forward
rates will not be a pure estimate of the market's expectations of future interest rates because they embody a
liquidity premium.


Magic of diversification

The effective reduction of risk (variance) of a portfolio, achieved without reduction
to expected returns through the combination of assets with low or negative correlations (covariances).
Related: Markowitz diversification


Markowitz diversification

A strategy that seeks to combine assets a portfolio with returns that are less than
perfectly positively correlated, in an effort to lower portfolio risk (variance) without sacrificing return.
Related: naive diversification


Naive diversification

A strategy whereby an investor simply invests in a number of different assets and
hopes that the variance of the expected return on the portfolio is lowered.
Related: Markowitz diversification.


Portfolio Diversification

See diversification


Principal of diversification

Highly diversified portfolios will have negligible unsystematic risk. In other
words, unsystematic risks disappear in portfolios, and only systematic risks survive.


Restricted Liquidity

Inability of an individual/company to convert an asset into cash or cash equivalent without significant cost.




 

 

 

 

 

 

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